2022 Nissan Leaf vs. Chevy Bolt: Is There Much of a Difference?

Elaine Duvet
Updated on Jun 6, 2022 · 5 min read
You've narrowed down your search to an electric hatchback, but keep coming back to these two models. So how do you choose?
Jerry, the car ownership super app, breaks down the key differences between the 2022 Nissan Leaf vs. Chevy Bolt.

2022 Nissan Leaf vs. Chevy Bolt: EV motor, power, and range

The 2022 Nissan Leaf offers perky acceleration but lacks a thrilling performance when compared to top EVs on the market. Though reasonably priced, the car’s subpar range might not be worth the savings. 
“The Leaf's standard battery pack is good for only 149 miles of estimated driving range; upgrading to a Plus model increases that driving range to 226 miles—better but hardly groundbreaking,” Car and Driver tells us. While it may be enough for short trips around the city, it’s less than half of what you’d get with the Tesla Model 3’s Long Range model. 
If you want the best value, you’ll have to upgrade to the Leaf’s S Plus trim, which starts at $33,425. You’ll get a longer driving range and an electric motor with more power. A good amount of equipment comes standard including a keyless entry, automatic climate control, automatic headlamps, and Apple CarPlay/Android Auto.  
According to Car and Driver, “The standard Leaf models come with a 147-horsepower electric motor that powers the front wheels; a 40.0-kWh battery pack provides the juice.” The Leaf Plus offers drivers a 62.0-kWh battery and 214 hp. 
The 2022 Nissan Leaf has an EPA of 114 mpg in the city and 94 mpg on the highway. On the other hand, the 2022 Chevy Bolt gets 131 mpg in the city and 109 mpg on the highway.
The Bolt is roomier than you think, with futuristic sheet metal and a stylish upgraded cabin. Employing a front-drive-only powertrain, the hatchback can travel up to 259 miles on a single charge. While it’s still not as much as the 353-mile range on the Model 3’s Long Range, it’s much more affordable. 
The Chevy sports 200 hp with 266 lb-ft of front-wheel torque. And according to Car and Driver, “This setup provides instantaneous response to accelerator inputs and ample low-end torque that lets you shoot off the line when the light turns green.” 
The composed ride also offers a one-pedal driving model (much like the Leaf’s e-Pedal feature) that allows drivers to take full advantage of regenerative braking without having to actually use the brakes in most situations. 
Owners no longer have to buy a separate home charger, as Chevy now offers a dual-level charging cord that plugs into both Level 1 and Level 2 outlets. With an increased Level 2 charging speed of 11 kW, you can fully charge your Bolt EV in about seven hours. 

2022 Nissan Leaf vs. Chevy Bolt: Cargo and comfort

Despite the heavy use of black plastic, the Nissan Leaf S and SVs incorporate various textures and design elements to create an upscale look. 
“The SL model offers an optional light-gray leather interior with a matching dash pad that looks and feels better. The gauge cluster features a large analog speedometer next to a 7.0-inch digital readout that can be reconfigured to show a variety of displays,” Car and Driver notes.
The seats are said to be comparable to La-Z-Boy recliners, and rear-seat passenger space is generous. While the backseat doesn’t fold flat, the Chevy Bolt still manages to deliver competitive cargo capacity. Car and Driver even fit seven-carry on suitcases behind the backseat and 19 with the back seat folded down.
An 8.0-inch infotainment system is available on all Leaf models, which includes Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, and an optional navigation feature. While it may not be the most attractive interface, Nissan Connect software is responsive and user-friendly. 
You’ll get a decent six-speaker audio system but will need to opt for the SL and SL plus trim for a seven-speaker Bose system. However, Consumer Reports wasn’t impressed with the upgrade. 
With the 2022 Chevy Bolt, drivers will enjoy more soft-touch surfaces, a flat-bottom steering wheel, and a new 8.0-inch fully digital gauge cluster. The car’s electronic shifter was swapped for some push buttons and pull toggles. 
You can fit two adults in the back and the front seats are much more comfortable than previous versions. Buyers will get 17 cubic feet behind the rear seats and 57 cubic inches when the rear seatbacks are flat. 
As far as infotainment, the Chevy Bolt offers a 10.2-inch touchscreen with wireless Android Auto and Apple CarPlay. You can also sign up for wireless smartphone charging and a subscription-based Wi-Fi hotspot. Not only does the system allow Amazon Alexa and Spotify to connect to built-in apps, but it provides over-the-air updates as well.

Consumer Reports weighs in

The 2022 Nissan Leaf ranges from $27,400 to $37,400, while the 2022 Chevrolet Bolt goes for $5,500 lower than its previous model, from $31,500 to $34,700. 
Overall, Consumer Reports gave the 2022 Nissan Leaf an overall score of 78, with the 2022 Chevrolet Bolt trailing behind with a 62. 
When it comes to 2022 Nissan Leaf vs. Chevy Bolt road test scores, they were pretty similar—the Leaf ranking 73 and the Bolt with a higher score of 78. For reliability, testers rated the Bolt 2 out of 5, and the Leaf received a 4 out of 5. The Bolt also beat out the Leaf in terms of owner satisfaction, but only by one point.
The two vehicles scored the same in many categories such as acceleration, transmission, fuel economy, and braking. With Edmunds, both scored a 7.9 out of 10 overall and received a five-star overall consumer rating.
So if you don’t mind using a less-common charging infrastructure and just want a simple EV to get you from point A to point B, the 2022 Nissan Leaf is a great option. But if you’d rather have a snazzy, stylish new hatchback meant for the open road, the 2022 Chevy Bolt is your gal.

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