Miraculously Nobody Was Injured After Car Crashes Through Roof of Missouri Home

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Andrew Koole
Updated on Apr 27, 2022 · 3 min read
It’s not every day that
home insurance
and
car insurance
play a factor in the same accident, but that’s just what happened early on Sunday, May 23, in Eureka, a suburb near St. Louis, Missouri.
Luckily nobody was injured after a wild car crash in Missouri | Twenty20

The details of the car crash

Newsweek
says speed was likely a factor in an incident that sent a car through the roof of a home at 2:00 AM. A Chevy Malibu reportedly swerved on a golf course parkway,
hit a tree
, flipped end-over-end down an embankment, and broke through an iron fence before landing in a bedroom where two people were sleeping.
One of the startled homeowners used a garden hose to put out a small fire caused by the crash while the two teenagers in the vehicle freed themselves from the wreckage.
"If you look at that crash it's like, how did somebody not die?" Scott Barthelmass, Eureka Fire Protection District's spokesman, told Newsweek. "It's literally incredible."
Fortunately, no one was injured in this catastrophe, but the teen driving the car caused a lot of damage.

What kinds of car insurance would kick in for this type of accident?

While it’s impossible to know the details of all the policies involved, hopefully, each person had the
right insurance
to cover them at the time.
In the case of the teenager driving the car, assuming he was at fault for the accident, he would need collision coverage for the damage to his vehicle and
liability insurance
to pay for the damage done to everything else.
But there are limits to how much liability insurance will cover specific to every insurance policy, and the carnage caused by this accident could have easily surpassed the teenager’s insurance plan. What insurance would cover the rest?

Would standard home insurance cover damage caused by a car?

In short, yes, in the likely case that the teenager’s liability coverage maxed out, the
homeowner’s insurance
would probably pay for any additional costs.
Standard home insurance includes four types of coverage: dwelling coverage, other structures coverage, personal property coverage, and additional living expenses.
In this case, dwelling coverage would pay to repair the structure of the home, personal property coverage would pay to repair or replace any other damaged property, and additional living expenses would take care of hotel rooms and anything else the homeowners needed while their house was reconstructed.

How do you know your insurance covers you for the unexpected?

While typical home insurance policies are designed for this type of scenario, car insurance is less straightforward. Liability insurance is legally required in all but two states, but the amount drivers are covered for varies, and collision coverage is optional.
It can be hard to find the balance between the cost of your insurance and the coverage you get. Thankfully,
Jerry
can help with that.
It’s this simple: download the Jerry app or go to getjerry.com. In less than 45 seconds, Jerry collects all of your information from your existing insurer.
Choose from competitive quotes from up to 45 top insurance companies and Jerry takes care of the rest–securing your new policy and cancelling your old one. No long forms. No calling around. No hard work. Just savings. The average Jerry user saves $879 a year on car insurance.

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