Uninsured Motorist Property Damage (UMPD)

Uninsured motorist property damage financially protects your property if you are hit by an at-fault uninsured driver. It isn’t available in all states.
Written by Hillary Kobayashi
Edited by Amy Bobinger
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Uninsured motorist property damage (UMPD) is a type of
car insurance
coverage that pays out for damage to your car and property if you are struck by an at-fault driver who doesn’t have car insurance. It isn’t required in all states and isn’t available in others. 

Uninsured motorist property damage explained

If you are involved in an accident, typically the at-fault driver's insurance company foots the bill. However, if the at-fault driver doesn’t have auto insurance, then you have to pay for everything—unless you have
uninsured motorist coverage/uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage
(UM/UIM). 
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UM/UIM includes both uninsured motorist property damage (UMPD) coverage and
uninsured motorist bodily injury
(UMBI) coverage. UMBI covers medical expenses, funeral expenses, lost wages, and other physical damage done to your person during an accident with an at-fault driver without car insurance.
Uninsured motorist property damage (UMPD) coverage pays to repair or replace your vehicle and property if you are hit by an at-fault driver who is uninsured or doesn’t have enough insurance. It may also cover some additional costs if the other driver doesn’t have sufficient property damage liability coverage.
UMPD will also cover
hit-and-runs
in most states—although in some states, insurers will only cover hit-and-runs after the at-fault driver has been found. 

Uninsured motorist property damage is mandatory in some states

Some state laws require uninsured motorist property damage coverage. Depending on the state where you live, uninsured motorist property damage might be mandatory, optional, or unavailable. 
Some states also have mandatory coverage limits and deductibles for uninsured motorist property damage. 
Our experts have compiled a list of the states that require or offer UMPD:
State
Uninsured motorist property damage coverage
Not offered
Optional
Not offered 
Optional
Optional
Optional
Not offered
Optional
District of Columbia
Requires $5,000 of UMPD
Not offered 
Optional
Hawaii
Not offered
Not offered 
Optional if you don’t have collision coverage
Optional
Not offered
Not offered 
Not offered 
Optional
Not offered
Requires $15,000 of UMPD
Not offered 
Not offered
Not offered 
Optional
Not offered
Not offered 
Not offered 
Not offered 
Optional
Requires $25,000 of UMPD
Optional
Not offered 
Requires $25,000 of UMPD
Not offered 
Optional
Offered but not widely available
Optional
Not offered 
Optional
Requires $25,000 of UMPD
Not offered 
Optional
Optional
Optional if you don’t have collision coverage
Requires $10,000 of UMPD/UMBI
Optional
Optional
Requires $25,000 of UMPD
Not offered 
Optional 

How an uninsured motorist property damage payout works 

How much your uninsured motorist property damage pays out will depend on how much coverage you have (or your “coverage limits”) and your
deductible
(the amount of money you have to pay before your car insurance kicks in). 

For instance, let’s say you’re involved in an accident with an at-fault uninsured or underinsured driver in
Maryland
and you have $15,000 of UMPD and a $200 deductible. If your car repairs cost a total of $10,000, your insurance coverage would pay out $9,800.

Uninsured motorist property damage is affordable

Uninsured motorist property damage is an affordable coverage that won’t significantly hike up your insurance premiums. 
Our experts have compiled data on average monthly insurance rates for policies that contain UMPD and UIMPD:
Coverage Limits
UMPD
UIMPD
1,000
$184
$167
10,000
$202
$195
25,000
$208
$215
50,000
$254
$249
According to the Insurance Information Institute (III), in 2022, 14%, or almost one in seven, drivers on the road are driving uninsured1. To protect yourself on the road, it’s a good idea to invest in uninsured motorist coverage.
Whether you need UMPD as part of your required coverage or you’re just looking to have a more robust policy, give the
Jerry
app a try. Just download the app, input your driver information, adjust your auto insurance coverage, and in just a few minutes you can be scrolling through quotes from the top insurance companies in the country.
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Uninsured motorist property damage coverage vs. collision coverage

Uninsured motorist property damage and
collision coverage
share a few similarities. However, collision insurance is a much more expansive coverage that will pay out regardless of fault, whereas UMPD only covers you if the other driver is at fault and uninsured. 
Collision insurance pays out to replace or repair your motor vehicle after a collision, regardless of fault. It also covers hit-and-run accidents, uninsured drivers, and drivers without enough coverage. 
UMPD only covers car accidents with at-fault uninsured drivers and while it might cover hit-and-runs in some states, sometimes the driver needs to be identified before UMPD will pay out. 
Uninsured motorist property damage can also cover your home and property if it is damaged by a driver without insurance, although a homeowners insurance claim might be a better way to go in this scenario. 
UMPD also typically has a lower deductible than collision coverage. 
Whether or not UMPD is required in your state, you might want to add collision coverage to your auto insurance policy. Collision coverage is sold together with
comprehensive coverage
and
liability insurance
in a full-coverage car insurance policy, which is a good option for drivers who want financial protection and peace of mind. 

FAQ

Do I need uninsured motorist property damage if I have personal injury protection (PIP) or medical payments (MedPay)?

Uninsured motorist property damage covers property while personal injury protection (PIP) and medical payments (MedPay) cover medical expenses. The coverages serve different purposes, and a discussion with your insurance agent about state law and the coverage that is right for you can help you decide on the policy you purchase. 

Does uninsured motorist property damage cover hit-and-runs?

It might. Uninsured motorist property damage covers accidents with a hit-and-run driver in some states. Other states will require you to identify the driver before UMPD will payout. 

Meet our experts

avatar
Hillary Kobayashi
Hillary Kobayashi is an insurance writer and editor specializing in insurance and finance topics. Hillary’s mission is to use her knowledge and love of education to help car owners better understand how they can save time and money on car ownership. The articles Hillary has published for Jerry span topics from state-specific bill of sale requirements to SR-22 insurance information.
Prior to joining Jerry, Hillary spent over ten years in education at Pacific University and the University of Oregon.
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Amy Bobinger
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Licensed Insurance Agent — Expert Insurance Editor
Expert insurance writer and editor Amy Bobinger specializes in car repair, car maintenance, and car insurance. Amy is passionate about creating content that helps consumers navigate challenges related to car ownership and achieve financial success in areas relating to cars.
Amy has over 10 years of writing and editing experience. After several years as a freelance writer, Amy spent four years as an editing fellow at WikiHow, where she co-authored over 600 articles on topics including car maintenance and home ownership. Since joining Jerry’s editorial team in 2022, Amy has edited over 2,500 articles on car insurance, state driving laws, and car repair and maintenance.

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