Lemon Laws in Minnesota

Find out if you’re getting ripped off on your car insurance in less than two minutes.
No long forms · No spam · No fees
  • What is it?
  • Minnesota
  • Am I covered?
  • Used cars
  • Your rights
  • Tips
  • Cheap insurance
Minnesota lemon laws apply to new motor vehicles, including passenger automobiles, pickup trucks, vans, and the motor vehicle chassis or van portion of a recreational vehicle (the living areas are not included). The vehicle must have been purchased or leased in Minnesota and be covered under a warranty.
An important thing to know about Minnesota is that although used cars don’t fall under the lemon law, Minnesota has some of the strongest used car laws in the country.
If you’re in over your head with repairs for your new or used car, give yourself a break when it comes to car insurance. For cheap car insurance quotes fast, use Jerry. A licensed broker that offers end-to-end support, the free Jerry app gathers affordable quotes, helps you switch plans, and even cancels your old policy for you.
Keep reading to learn more about lemon laws in Minnesota.
RECOMMENDED
Compare auto insurance policies
No spam or unwanted phone calls · No long forms · No fees, ever
Find savings (100% Free)

What is a lemon law?

Lemon laws are federal and state laws that protect consumers who have unknowingly purchased damaged items—especially defective vehicles. The specifics of lemon laws vary from state to state, but they all help compensate buyers who purchase vehicles that don’t meet basic quality and performance standards.

Is there a lemon law in Minnesota?

Yes, Minnesota’s lemon law applies to new motor vehicles, including passenger automobiles, pickup trucks, vans, and the motor vehicle chassis or van portion of a recreational vehicle. The living areas of an RV are not included.
The vehicle in question must have been purchased or leased (as long as the lease term is longer than four months) in Minnesota and must be used for personal or household purposes at least 40% of the time. It also must be covered under the manufacturer’s warranty.
Key Takeaway Minnesota’s lemon law applies to new passenger vehicles that were purchased in Minnesota and still under warranty.

Is my defect covered under the lemon law?

Minnesota’s lemon law covers nonconformities—defects that do not conform to the warranty and impact the use or market value of the car.
If the car has problems that stem from neglect, abuse, or misuse on the part of the car owner, it won’t be covered under the lemon law.

Are used cars covered under the lemon law?

No, used cars are not covered under Minnesota’s lemon law.
But while Minnesota doesn’t have a lemon law for used cars, the state does have some of the strongest used car warranty laws in the country. They will protect you if you buy a used car from a dealer and the car wasn’t purchased “as is.” The laws do not cover private car sales.

What about new cars?

Yes, Minnesota’s lemon law applies to new vehicles including passenger cars, pickup trucks, vans, and the motor vehicle chassis or van portion of a recreational vehicle. The living areas of an RV are not covered.
The vehicle must have been purchased or leased (for more than four months) in Minnesota and must still be under warranty.

How to pursue your lemon law rights in Minnesota

If you want to pursue your lemon law rights in Minnesota, you’ll need to notify the manufacturer, take your car in for repairs, and maybe even pursue legal action.

Repairs and reports

For the lemon law to be used in Minnesota, you must notify the manufacturer about the defect (which must be covered under the warranty) within the first two years of the delivery of the vehicle or the duration of the warranty, whichever comes first.
In most situations, the manufacturer has four attempts to try to repair the vehicle. If the defect could cause serious injury or death, such as with steering or brake failures, the manufacturer is only entitled to one repair attempt.
The law also applies if the vehicle cannot be used or is under repair for a cumulative 30 business days. The initial defect needs to occur within the warranty or in the first two years, but the manufacturer is allowed repair attempts until the end of the third year.
If all attempts to repair the issue fail, you must write to the manufacturer to advise that the car is a lemon and you would like it repaired or replaced under the lemon law. The manufacturer is then allowed one final attempt to fix the defect.
Be sure to keep all receipts and invoices from the repair attempts. You may need them if you decide to pursue your claim in court.

Arbitration

Depending on the manufacturer, you might need to try arbitration before using the lemon law. Resolving the dispute in arbitration is ideal because it’s free and much faster than going to court.
If you can settle the matter in arbitration, you’ll be able to choose whether you want a replacement vehicle or a refund.
If you’re still having trouble with the manufacturer after arbitration, you can file a lawsuit. It’s a good idea to hire an attorney for this, since it’s a complex legal process and even a small misstep can affect the strength of your case. If you win, the manufacturer will likely have to pay your legal fees.
Remember that no matter how good your case is, there’s always a chance that you won’t win. There are many factors at play and each situation is different.
Key Takeaway Bring vehicle defects to the attention of the manufacturer right away and then keep all repair documentation, since you’ll need it if you decide to take your case to court.
RECOMMENDED
Compare auto insurance policies
No spam or unwanted phone calls · No long forms · No fees, ever
Find savings (100% Free)

Lemon law tips

If you’re thinking about pursuing a lemon law case, keep the following things in mind:
  • Any unauthorized modifications to your car or damage due to your own neglect, abuse, or misuse will not be covered under the lemon law
  • When you take your car in for repairs, go to an authorized manufacturer or dealership and keep copies of all of your receipts and invoices
  • Use the same language each time you take your car to the shop—most lemon laws only apply to a single problem that needs to be fixed more than once, so your words matter
  • If Minnesota’s lemon law doesn’t apply to your case, look into the federal Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act

Finding cheap car insurance

If you’ve got a lemon on your hands, you’ve been through enough. Let Jerry take the stress out of buying car insurance.
As a licensed broker, Jerry can find you custom quotes that meet your coverage needs in less than a minute. Once you choose the plan that’s right for you, Jerry handles all the phone calls, paperwork, and even renewals when the time comes. You’ll enjoy all the savings and coverage with none of the usual hassles.
The average Jerry user saves $879 per year on their car insurance!
“I found out about these guys on Instagram. I was pleasantly surprised that it was really well put together with a very simple process, too. I even found a better price for what I was already paying currently and that’s what deserved 5 stars and a written review from me.” —Satisfied Jerry user
RECOMMENDED
Haven’t shopped for insurance in the last six months? There might be hundreds $$$ in savings waiting for you.
avatar
Judith switched to Progressive
icon savingsSaved $725 annually
avatar
Alexander switched to Travelers
icon savingsSaved $834 annually
avatar
Annie switched to Nationwide
icon savingsSaved $668 annually

Easiest way to compare and buy car insurance

√
No long forms
√
No spam or unwanted phone calls
√
Quotes from top insurance companies