What's Expected for the 2023 Mazda Miata?

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Mazda is known for making some great, reliable cars like the CX-5 and the Miata. Soon, the family might get even bigger, as Mazda will be making some exciting changes to its lineup. 
One specific change will be happening to the Mazda Miata, which will get a hybrid version very soon. Here's a look at the 2023 Mazda Miata, and how Mazda plans on creating an electric future for itself and its customers.
Black car grille with Mazda logo
Brands like Mazda are starting to offer hybrid versions of their more popular models, like the 2023 Miata.

Possible specs for the 2023 Mazda Miata

Mazda expects to introduce more electrified cars in upcoming years, as reported by Car and Driver. Between 2022 and 2025, Mazda wants to start selling five new standard hybrids, five new plug-in hybrids, and three new electric vehicles (EVs). One of those thirteen models is likely to be an updated version of the Miata. 
According to CarBuzz, Mazda may already have the engine for the next generation of the Miata. Currently, the Miata uses the Skyactiv-G series engines, with a choice between a 1.5-liter or a 2.0-liter model. The Miata, however, might get access to the new Skyactiv-X series.
These engines are considered mild hybrids, as they pair a small electric motor with a regular combustion engine. That little electric motor will add more power to the Miata while improving its overall efficiency. CarBuzz theorizes that a 2.0-liter engine paired with a 24-volt electric motor could give the 2023 Miata up to 188 horsepower and 177 lb-ft of torque.

Mazda's grand plan for an electric future

While the 2023 Miata may come with a mild-hybrid engine, Mazda's electrification plans aren’t overly ambitious. Mazda aims for EVs to make up 25% of their lineup by 2030, and to go carbon neutral by 2050.  
Mazda's EV plans are only just starting to take shape, while other brands have already released multiple EVs. Mazda's first EV, the MX-30, will debut later this year in select markets. In the U.S., California will be the first and only state to sell the EV for a while. Mazda will start selling the MX-30 in other states in 2022. 
Although their electric plans are in the works, this is still relatively slow progress compared to manufacturers like GM. Hopefully, Mazda’s reputation for reliability will bolster their EV sales enough, despite their slim selection and availability.

How do Mazda's EV plans stack up against other automakers?

Other brands, however, are quicker on the pedal. Many automakers already have EVs on sale in America and elsewhere, and have plans to assist with the world’s transition to EVs.  
Honda, for example, wants to only sell EVs by 2040. Mercedes-Benz is even more ambitious, aiming to go all-electric by 2030. Audi's goal for electrification is 2033.   
That being said, Volkswagen's plans are pretty similar to Mazda's. Volkswagen wants to go all-electric by 2040 and carbon neutral by 2050. On top of that, Volkswagen wants to be one of the largest EV automakers.  
New regulations are forcing automakers to make greener cars. Some states will ban the sale of gas-powered cars by 2030, forcing companies like Mazda to adapt.  
If you’re looking to buy a new EV, Jerry can help you insure it at an affordable price. A licensed broker, Jerry does all the hard work of finding cheap quotes from the top name-brand insurance companies and buying new car insurance. Jerry will even help you cancel your old policy.

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