The 1982 Cars That Stand Out Above the Rest

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The year 1982 wasn’t great for auto manufacturing. While there were many new models produced that year, very few of them were impressive and many were downright duds. Still, there remain a few classic cars from 1982 that hold up even today—but unless you scored one of these, it wasn’t a good year for buying a new car. 
According to Supercars, one reason why 1982 was such a miss for auto manufacturing is that it represented a “major crossroads” in car-making. Most new cars produced that year were either new-and-improved versions of much older models or brand-new cars with engineering kinks that were still being worked out. 
This meant that new 1982 cars were either stale and unoriginal or not quite ready for the market yet. All in all, not a successful year for new car production. 
Nevertheless, here are five 1982 cars that continue to be considered classics. 
There are a few classic cars from 1982 that hold up even today.

1982 Ford Mustang GT

This 1982 car was a remodeled Ford Mustang, designed to raise the older model’s performance level. 
The newer model was a 3-door hatchback with a 302 engine and a 2V Motorcraft carburetor. It included a range of updated exterior features, such as a rear spoiler, cast aluminum wheels, a new front dam, and a non-functional hood scoop, according to Supercars
Offering “modest” performance metrics overall, the 1982 Mustang GT was well-priced. Arguably, it offered the best value-for-performance of any GT available at the time.  

1982 Lamborghini Jalpa 3500

This 1982 vehicle has become a classic in the years since. The entry-level sports car debuted in 1981, boasting 255 horsepower at 7000 rpm. Its engine was a 3.5-liter double-overhead camshaft, a remake of the V8 engine used in the Lamborghini Silhouette, after which the Jalpa was modeled. 

1982 Ferrari 308 GTS Quattrovalvole 

 The 308 was launched at the Paris Motor Show in 1982 and was available in both GTB and GTS makes. This 1982 model was an upgrade from the earlier Dino 246 GT, and was later updated once again in 1985 as the 328. 
The name “quattrovalvole” is Italian for “four valves,” a reference to the updated model’s revamped four-valves-per-cylinder design. The new model’s horsepower was hiked up to 240; a design victory, as the previous model had sacrificed power for its emission control features. 

1982 Lamborghini Countach LP5000S

Originally introduced in 1974, the Lamborghini Countach was given a much-needed update in 1982, replacing its underwhelming 4-liter engine with a higher-performance 5-liter engine. Around 320 were produced over three years, meaning that the 1982 Countach has since become a valuable collector’s item

1982 Lancia 037 Stradale

According to Supercars, the 1982 Lancia 037 Stradale “featured all the hallmarks of a no-compromise race car, but with regard to passenger car regulations.” The model featured a double wishbone suspension, a ZF five-speed gearbox, two 35-liter tanks, Brembo Brakes, and an Abarth-supercharged engine. 
With a low weight of only 2570 pounds, the model had great speed and power. This was due in part to its aerodynamic design, including its lightweight fibre-glass, Kevlar-reinforced body. 
The model reached impressive speeds of 60 mph in only 5.8 seconds. Despite being a design success, just 207 of these vehicles were made, making them quite rare today.

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