What Ferrari Has Butterfly Doors?

The Ferrari Enzo and the Ferrari LaFerrari both featured exotic butterfly doors.
Written by Amber Reed
Reviewed by Hillary Kobayashi
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The Ferrari LaFerrari and the Ferrari Enzo both have butterfly doors, but don’t expect to snag these rare specimens at your corner car lot. 
A Ferrari is a unique enough vehicle in and of itself, but a Ferrari with butterfly doors? Get outta here! These two models of Ferrari are rare, deliriously fast, and exceptionally expensive. 
And
car insurance
for these creatures? You don’t want to know.  But hey, sometimes it’s fun to take a detour through the land of “if you have to ask, you can’t afford it,” and these are some of the most spectacular rides around. 

What Ferraris have butterfly doors? 

There have been two models of Ferrari that have had butterfly doors—the Ferrari Enzo and the Ferrari LaFerrari. Both are no longer made, and both were made in extremely limited numbers. 
Let’s have a look at these rare creatures!

Ferrari LaFerrari review

The name might not be the most original, but that was kind of the point. The LaFerrari (translates to “The Ferrari”) was produced between 2013 and 2018 and was designed to be the ultimate Ferrari. Just over 700 were made, and the MSRP at the time was in the arena of 1.5 million dollars
This is one kind of car where buying used will not save you money—today, a LaFerrari coupe runs in the three to four-million-dollar range!
Some consider the LaFerrari to be the best supercar ever, and it’s not hard to see why. Under the hood, you’ll find a 6.3-liter, V12 mild hybrid engine. That’s right—it’s a hybrid! 
This setup will generate 780 horsepower and 516 lb-ft of torque and can rocket from 0 to 60 mph in 2.6 seconds. With a top speed of 218 mph, it’s one fast butterfly. 
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Ferrari Enzo review

The second Ferrari model with butterfly doors is the Ferrari Enzo—which was built and named in honor of the company’s founder. These were produced between 2002 and 2004 in a very limited run of 400 units
This beauty was developed using Formula One technology, and it shows. The 6.0-liter naturally aspirated V12 engine produced 651 horsepower and 485 lb-ft of torque. 
It can make 0 to 60 mph in 3.1 seconds and has a top speed of 221 mph. When it was new, the Ferrari Enzo had an MSRP of around $700,000. Today, you’d have to snag one at auction—and then you’d have to have several million dollars to spend! 
The only white Ferrari Enzo ever made was recently sold via private auction by
Sotheby’s
. The purchase price is unknown, but it was valued at around four million dollars. Previous owners of the white Ferrari Enzo include Pope John Paul II (he auctioned it off for charity) and a reclusive Swiss-German billionaire. You can’t make this stuff up. 

What are butterfly doors?

Okay, let’s pause a minute. If you’re like most people, you don’t give a whole lot of thought to car doors. But as it turns out, there’s a whole world of exotic car doors just waiting to be opened. 
Although they generally appear on prototypes or concept cars, there have been a few mass-market models that have attempted to redefine the concept of “door.” Let’s take a look! 
Butterfly doors are a type of door that is typically only seen on the most exotic and expensive cars. They’re often mistakenly called scissor doors, but they’re not the same thing! 
Like the wings of the insect that they’re named after, butterfly doors open up and out from the car’s A-pillar (the pillar that’s on either side of the windshield). These are almost always found in the realm of serious performance cars, like the McLaren F1, the McLaren P1, and our fine Ferrari friends. 
Ultra-luxurious cars, like the Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren, often get the butterfly door effect as well. However,
Toyota
did make a cheeky mass-market production car for the Japanese market—called the Sera—that boasted butterfly doors. 
Volkswagen threw its hat into the butterfly-door ring with the
Volkswagen
XL1, a limited production concept car. The
BMW i8
is the only Bimmer to ever have butterfly doors and is one of the more unique BMWs that you can find
Scissor doors also open from the car’s A-pillar, but they only open upwards. Since they don’t swing out, they don’t require as much space to open as butterfly doors. Scissor doors are also referred to as “Lambo doors,” as they’re quite famously associated with some models of Lamborghini and are often seen on performance or luxury cars. 
Gull-wing doors are hinged from the roof and open upward and are most often associated with the famous DeLorean in Back to the Future. But there are plenty of non-time-traveling cars with gull-wing doors—
Mercedes Benz
has made a few really cool ones in the past, as has Aston Martin. 
Today you can see gull-wing doors on the
Tesla Model X
, although Elon felt the need to introduce more confusion into the mix and called them falcon wing doors.
Porsche
has dropped hints that they may be unveiling their first car with gull-wing doors sometime in the near future, but nothing’s set in stone. 
The morbidly named suicide doors open from hinges in the back versus the front of the door and are commonly seen as the “back seat” door on full-size pickup trucks. These were fairly popular decades ago but fell out of favor in the latter part of the twentieth century. As the name suggests, they weren’t terribly safe—they tended to pop open at high speeds, and this was before seat belts were common. 

Can you add butterfly doors to a Ferrari?

If you’re dying to have a Ferrari with butterfly doors but are lacking the means to get an Enzo or a LaFerrari, don’t despair! Adding vertical doors is something that can be done—if you have a Ferrari F430 from 2005 to 2009.
CARiD
sells Lambo door kits that fit the Ferrari F430 that range from $800 to almost $6,000.
Vertical Doors
sells one for around $2,000
This is just for the kit, mind you. You’ll also need to get them installed, unless you’re super handy and can do it yourself. Remember that big modifications like this can have an impact on your warranty and your car insurance, so check with your insurance provider before you embark on a butterfly door journey.
Altering elements of a vehicle’s frame can also introduce some safety concerns, so proceed with caution. And of course, there are some Ferrari purists out there who would be utterly aghast at any aftermarket mods, but hey—it’s your ride. 
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