Buying Guide for a 1958 Oldsmobile

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GM’s Oldsmobile is a staple brand when it comes to classic cars. The cars’ style and popularity made them an iconic part of the ‘50s and ‘60s. 1958 came with some memorable releases for Oldsmobile, both the 88 and 98 models receiving dramatic updates to their fascia. 
If you’re looking to purchase a 1958 Oldsmobile, we’ve compiled some helpful information on how much they cost, where they’re sold, and what models are available.
Red and white 1950s car
A 1958 Oldsmobile 88.

How much does a 1958 Oldsmobile cost?

According to Classic.com, the average price for a 1958 Oldsmobile is $69,561. However, this is a combined analysis of both of Oldsmobile’s 1958 models, meaning the average for each model individually may fluctuate from this price. 
The 98 models tended to stay on the higher end of sales, with a low of $57,200 and high of $253,000, which was also the most expensive 1958 Oldsmobile sale on the site. The 88 hung only a bit lower, though, with a low of $13,750 and high of $140,250.
Hagerty claims that a 1958 Super 88 is worth $38,500 in its best condition, but the car’s classic status could be enough to inspire higher bids.

Where can I buy a 1958 Oldsmobile?

Used car dealerships can tend to have older cars in stock, though you might have the best luck at ones that focus specifically on classic cars. Online sources like Facebook Marketplace and Craigslist are also options, though you might have to do some work to make sure the car is in good condition.
Auction houses are also a good place to look for classic cars, since it can be difficult to find specific classics on their own. Classic.com is one such auction site, and has information on past and present listings available, as well as data on the average prices and other similar listings.
The site has only sold 18 1958 Oldsmobiles in the last five years. This could mean the market for 1958 Oldsmobiles might be a bit sparse.

1958 Oldsmobile models

According to the Automotive History Preservation Society, there were two models released by Olds in 1958: the 88 and the 98. Each were sedans with long bodies typical of the ‘50s. The exteriors, though, received major redesigns from the previous model year.
The vehicles had numerous chrome features, including stripes of it running down the side and strips surrounding the headlights and taillights. The bodies were also redesigned to have a squarish build rather than the smooth curved edges of past models.
The 88 came in Dynamic and Super trim levels with a J-2 upgrade option. The Dynamic 88 was equipped with a Rocket V-8 with 265 horsepower and 390 lb-ft of torque. The Super 88 and 98 shared an upgraded version of the Rocket V-8, this one with 305 horsepower and 410 of torque.
The J-2 Rocket V-8 and J-2R Rocket V-8 engine upgrades were available on the Super 88 and 98 models. The J-2 was the first upgrade, giving the engine power a boost and putting out 312 horsepower with 415 lb-ft of torque. The highest upgrade was the J-2R, which had 325 horsepower and 425 lb-ft of torque.

Restoring your Oldsmobile

If your Oldsmobile is having issues and has seen some wear, restoration is a great way to get it back in good shape and make sure it stays that way for years to come.
Unless you plan to outsource your restoration project to a classic car specialist, the biggest outlay you’ll face is investing in the tools, equipment and materials needed to complete the renovation to a high standard—and that’s after you’ve found a space large enough to act as a workshop.
However, make sure to thoroughly examine your car before you begin, looking for signs of rot or rust around the body. If you’re not an expert yourself, asking a professional if you find similar issues could be a good idea, as some parts may not be worth fixing if they are too damaged.
Once you restore your car, make sure you insure it properly with Jerry. A licensed broker that offers end-to-end support, the Jerry app gathers affordable quotes, helps you switch plans, and will even help you cancel your old policy.

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