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Carburetor Replacement Cost Estimate

Worried you might overpay for your carburetor replacement? Use Jerry’s GarageGuard to get fair cost estimate for your carburetor replacement.
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John Davis
Expert Automotive Writer
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Reviewed by Kathleen Flear, Director of Content
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Edited by Jessica Barrett, Senior Car & Insurance Editor

How much does it cost to replace a carburetor?

On average, an automotive carburetor replacement costs $200 to $600. Depending on the make and model of your vehicle, parts can cost $100 to $300, with additional labor costs of $100 to $300. 
Keep in mind: Carburetor (carb) repair costs vary also depending on whether you’re installing a high-end performance or fuel efficiency carburetor. For example, performance carburetors range between $150-$1,000 for parts alone. 
How long does it take to replace a carburetor? Carburetors can take up to 3 hours to replace, although it could take shorter or longer depending on your vehicle's make and model. Times can vary as a result of what car repairs need completed. Smaller jobs, such as tightening adjustment screws, repairing fuel lines, and cable management can be done quicker than larger jobs, like replacing and installing a new carburetor.
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How did we estimate these prices?

Jerry's experts researched and collected data from 2500+ real repair shops in all 50 states in the US, including everything from the total cost of repair services to the hourly labor cost for mechanic labor in each shop. We combined that data with our expert database of hundreds of real repair jobs, thousands of real cars, millions of real car part prices in order to best estimate the cost of each repair service. Our labor cost estimate is calculated by taking the average hourly labor rate for a certified mechanic in the US, times the number of hours it takes on average to complete a repair. We recommend you compare your local shops with Jerry and contact those shops directly to get final pricing for your vehicle.

What parts do I need for my carburetor replacement and how much do those parts cost?

To perform a carburetor replacement, you will need either an aftermarket or rebuilt carburetor:
  1. Aftermarket or rebuilt carburetor: The carburetor is a component on older vehicles that atomizes fuel and mixes it with air. Depending on the style of carburetor you choose, a new aftermarket carburetor could cost anywhere from $500 to $2,000. A rebuilt carburetor is a much cheaper option at $200 to $500, but it won’t be as efficient, and it won’t last as long.
You may also find that you can rebuild your own carburetor using one or more of the following parts:
  1. Float chamber: In a carburetor, the float chamber acts as a sort of storage fuel tank, thus allowing it to continuously supply fuel to your vehicle. Each float chamber has a float valve that works to maintain the fuel levels in the chamber. The average float chamber costs $15-$30. 
  2. Strainer: The strainer filters the fuel before it enters the float chamber. It’s made up of a fine wire mesh that removes dust and other debris from the fuel. Without it, blockage can occur in the nozzle, interrupting flow. Strainers typically cost upwards of $50. 
  3. Metering system: Metering systems are responsible for correcting the mixture of air-fuel by controlling the flow of the fuel into the nozzle. As air passes through the venturi, it creates a low-pressure field to aid in comparing pressure in the float chamber. From there, fuel is put into the air stream to the metering orifice. A new metering system will run you anywhere from $60-$100.
  4. Idling system: For instances where you’re at idle speeds, the idling system allows for rich mixtures of air and fuel to pass from the float chamber to the venturi tube. Idling systems generally cost between {X} and {X}. 
  5. Throttle valve: At the exit of the venturi tube, a butterfly valve is placed to control the speed of your vehicle by supplying a specific amount of air-fuel mixture. If open, more mixture is pulled into the cylinder giving a higher output. Less mixture means less power. These parts can vary in price, costing around $7-$80 depending on the type you select.
  6. Choke valve: Similar to the throttle valve in construction, the choke valve is located at the entrance of the venturi tube. It supplies a very rich mixture of air-fuel during the beginning of the colder seasons. If fully open, a normal amount of air can flow through the venturi, forming a normal mixture. If closed, a lower amount of air but higher amount of fuel passes through the discharge nozzle giving a richer combination. Parts typically cost between $5-$50.
Many of these parts can be found together in carburetor rebuild kits that usually sell for anywhere from $15 to $50 depending on the parts included. You can buy carburetor parts for your vehicle from auto parts stores such as AutoZone, Advance Auto Parts, and O'Reilly Auto Parts, or from online retailers like Amazon and Summit Racing. Our top three recommended brands for carburetor parts are Holley, Edelbrock, and Weber, but keep in mind that prices and recommended brands will vary depending on your vehicle’s year, make, and model.
When shopping for your carburetor replacement, either OEM or aftermarket parts are acceptable. As OEM products are designed to fit your vehicle, and most carburetors vary in size depending on your vehicle, this is definitely the safest option. However, if you’re searching for budget-friendly options with the same quality, aftermarket products are most likely a better fit.
Most carburetor replacement parts and kits can be purchased online and in-store at various auto body and repair service shops, like AutoZone, Advance Auto Parts, and O'Reilly Auto Parts. Additionally, carburetor kits and parts can also be found across online retailers, including Amazon and Summit Racing. Refer to your owner’s manual before purchasing to ensure you’ve selected the right parts and sizes for your vehicle.

Where can I get my carburetor replaced?

Finding the right mechanic for your car repair can get difficult—especially if you don’t already have one on hand.
Jerry's GarageGuard™
can compare fair price repair estimates* for you to simplify your carburetor replacement journey. 
Jerry's GarageGuard™ uses real hourly rates from over 2,500 repair shops in the US to determine diagnostic fees (and whether they’re included in your service fee). Customers also receive access to real reviews to help them select the best option for the best price. 
Take a look at some of our vetted shops below, and get the app to compare repair costs in your area.
174 Reviews
Yoo's Auto Service & Collision
address
189 W Duncannon Ave, Philadelphia, PA
Carburetor Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$177
(Parts - $156, Labor - $21)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$100
158 Reviews
Tire World
address
202 W Hillsborough Ave, Tampa, FL
Carburetor Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$185
(Parts - $156, Labor - $29)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$49.95
185 Reviews
Goodyear Auto Service - Coral Gables
address
3690 Bird Rd, Coral Gables, FL
Carburetor Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$185
(Parts - $156, Labor - $29)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$130
143 Reviews
Playa Vista Shell
address
8126 Lincoln Blvd, Manhattan Beach, CA
Carburetor Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$185
(Parts - $156, Labor - $29)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$0
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How did we vet these shops?

Jerry experts researched 2500+ real repair shops across the US. We talked to real shop customers, and analyzed both real shop pricing data and thousands of real customer reviews from each shop to verify them individually. We do not partner with the shops listed above, and our analysis is always unbiased.

How will a mechanic replace my carburetor?

As there are several different types of carburetors for various vehicle makes and models, your mechanic’s step-by-step process may vary. However, most mechanics will follow this process to complete your carburetor repair:
  1. Inspection: Before beginning, your mechanic will examine your vehicle and engine code to determine whether or not more damage has occurred.
  2. Disconnect battery cables: After confirming that you require a carburetor replacement, your mechanic will disconnect your battery cables to avoid any sparks that could occur. Since removing a carburetor requires direct contact with gasoline, this is an important step to prevent potential fires.
  3. Remove air filter/fuel filter: As most carburetors have an air filter or fuel filter to keep debris out of the engine, it will need to be removed by unscrewing any bolts, clips or screws.
  4. Identify and remove vacuum hoses: Next, your mechanic will identify and remove vacuum hoses and other connections, like the pressure control solenoid. They may also take photos of the hoses prior to removal to refer to when re-installing.
  5. Remove linkages: If your vehicle has throttle linkages, these will also be removed as they are attached directly to the side of the carburetor. 
  6. Disconnect fuel supply line: Once the fuel supply line is disconnected, your mechanic will release any residual fuel pressure in the line. 
  7. Remove old carburetor: Finally, the old carburetor is removed by undoing any bolts, nuts, studs, and screws holding it in place. When removing the carburetor, your mechanic will use extra caution as too much force can damage or break the flanges, which will cause vacuum leaks and rough running conditions.
  8. Block off intake manifold opening: To prevent debris build up in between steps, your mechanic will block off the intake manifold opening. 
  9. Install replacement: Before the installation of your new carburetor, your mechanic needs to perform a carburetor cleaning to ensure all debris and dust is clear for a leak free seal. If a new gasket is required, your mechanic will remove the old one and then apply a new gasket before placing it in the new carburetor. If necessary, your mechanic will also apply a new fuel filter. 
  10. Check for leaks: When all the steps are completed in reverse order and your new carburetor is in place and secure, your mechanic will check for leaks by starting the vehicle and listening for whistling noises. 
  11. Final inspection: Once all the above are finished, you will most likely conduct a road test to ensure proper functioning. If a fuel smell is detected during this time, pull to the side of the road and shut the engine off immediately and contact your mechanic. 

What happens if I don’t replace my carburetor?

Carburetors are the mainframe for your vehicle’s fuel. If you don’t replace your carburetor or perform regular maintenance on it, build up is likely to occur and cause further malfunctioning. The following are results of a neglected carburetor: 
  • Decreased fuel efficiency (more gas stops)
  • Engine damage and failure
  • Poor engine code readings
  • Poor air/fuel flow
  • Transmission issues
  • Defective control circuit (float, choke, idle, etc.)

What is a carburetor?

A carburetor is used to mix both air and fuel together to help your engine cylinders to power your vehicle. It operates using vacuum power and cable control and is classified as the ‘heart of the engine’. 
Although carburetors aren’t often used in modern vehicles, they can be found in older models and makes. There are currently 3 kinds of carburetors on the market: the single barrel, double barrel, and quad carburetors, which possess up to 4 venturis to provide more power. Each type of carburetor also includes a variety of sub-types.

When should I replace the carburetor on my car? 

Carburetors should be replaced every 100,000 miles, but routinely inspected for cleaning purposes. A dirty carburetor can cause just as many problems and as much damage to your vehicle’s internal systems as a defective one. 
Common symptoms of a deteriorating carburetor are: 
  1. Reduced engine performance: This is the biggest sign that your carburetor either needs cleaned, or replaced. The carburetor manages air and fuel mixtures to help you get the best performance out of your vehicle. If it’s not getting the same gas mileage or is slow to accelerate, check your carburetor. 
  2. Black exhaust smoke: No black exhaust smoke should ever come from your exhaust pipe, even in diesel vehicles. This indicates that there is too much fuel in the mixture, and too rich of a mixture burns additional fuel and emits increased emissions.
  3. Backfiring/overheating engine: If your fuel mixture is too lean due to a faulty carburetor, your engine can backfire or overheat, affecting your car’s performance.
  4. Difficulty starting: When the air-fuel mixture in your car is off, you may experience trouble starting it due to poor fuel economy. While this could be a sign of a damaged battery or starter, it’s also worth checking your carburetor.

How often should a carburetor be replaced?

Carburetors only need to be replaced every 100,000 miles, depending on the make and model of your vehicle. If you have an older model vehicle, then it’s possible that it may need to be replaced more frequently. However, carburetors do require regular maintenance and cleaning, as a buildup of gunk can clog the internal systems and cause further damage. 

Can I replace my carburetor myself?

Yes, but only do so if you’re confident in your DIY abilities and mechanical knowledge. While carburetor replacements are one of the more simple car repair processes, it also requires an understanding of battery cables, fuel systems, and auto parts. If you’re unsure of which steps to take, contact a licensed mechanic to assist in replacing your carburetor. 
Warning: Fuel is extremely flammable, so when completing a carburetor replacement on your own, make sure to take extra precautions to prevent injury and increase your overall safety. 

FAQs

No, with proper care and maintenance, carburetors aren’t difficult to maintain. However, if you need a carburetor replacement, this is where things can get expensive. If you suspect you need a carburetor replacement, it’s best to contact a mechanic who can inspect your engine code and determine exact pricing.
Carburetors affect fuel consumption, acceleration, and high speed driving. When your carburetor is faulty, it can impact your vehicle’s overall performance, causing sluggish acceleration.
Fuel injection is the main reason why carburetors were phased out from modern vehicles and replaced with electronic fuel injection systems. Fuel injection is easier to control and uses fuel more efficiently, resulting in lower fuel consumption and emissions.

Meet Our Experts

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John Davis
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Car Expert
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Certified mechanic with 10+ years of experience
John Davis is an expert automotive writer and former automotive mechanic. John's work spans multiple categories, and he relishes the opportunity to research a new subject and expand his area of expertise and industry knowledge. To date, John has written more than 200 articles covering car maintenance and care, car advice, how-to guides, and more.
Prior to joining Jerry’s editorial team, John worked as a mechanic and freelance writer, creating content for clients including HotCars and SetPower.
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Jessica Barrett
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Car Expert
Jessica Barrett is a senior insurance writer and editor with 10 years of experience in the automotive and travel industries. A specialist in car insurance, car loans, and car ownership, Jessica’s mission is to create comprehensive content that car owners can use to manage their costs and improve their lives. As a managing editor for a team of writers and insurance specialists, Jessica has edited over 2,000 articles for Jerry on topics ranging from local insurance shopping tips to refinancing car loans with bad credit.
Before joining Jerry as a senior content editor in 2021, Jessica created visual content for clients such as Expedia, Vivid Seats, Budget Direct Car Insurance, Angie’s List, and HomeAdvisor. Her content was published in Business Insider, Forbes, Apartment Therapy, and the BBC.
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Kathleen Flear
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Car Expert
Kathleen Flear is an expert insurance writer and editor who heads up Jerry’s editorial team as director of content. Kathleen empowers drivers to make smart car ownership decisions through  best-in-class articles on insurance, loans, and maintenance. Prior to joining Jerry in 2021, Kathleen served as managing editor for a team of SEO content marketing professionals at Article-Writing.co and worked as a freelance writer and editor for a range of digital publications, including Chicago Literati magazine and Golden Words. She earned a bachelor’s degree in English language and literature from Queen’s University, and a master’s degree in creative writing and fiction from Sierra Nevada University.
*The price information provided on our car repair webpages is intended for general informational purposes only. Actual prices for car repair services may vary based on various factors, including but not limited to the make and model of your vehicle, the extent of repair required, and the prevailing market conditions. All prices for real repair shops are estimations based on our research only. Therefore, the prices listed on our webpages should not be considered as final quotes or binding offers.