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Heater Blower Motor Resistor Replacement Cost Estimate

Worried you might overpay for your heater blower motor resistor replacement? Use Jerry's GarageGuard to get fair cost estimate for your heater blower motor resistor replacement.
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John Davis
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Reviewed by Kathleen Flear, Director of Content
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Edited by Jessica Barrett, Senior Car & Insurance Editor

How much does a heater blower motor resistor replacement cost?

The average cost of a heater blower motor resistor replacement is $166, including $67 for parts and $86 for labor. The exact price will depend on your vehicle’s year and model.
The parts cost will include a new resistor, but your car might also require a fresh blower motor, heater core, or condenser. As for the labor costs, it takes around 0.6 hours for a certified mechanic to inspect your vehicle, determine whether a repair is necessary, and then perform the heater blower motor resistor replacement. 
Here’s how much it’ll cost to replace the heater blower motor resistor of some popular vehicle models:
Estimate DateCustomerCarFair Cost EstimateParts CostLabor CostLabor Time
May 24, 2024
GMC Canyon
$174
$103
$71
0.6 Hours
May 22, 2024
Audi A4
$151
$103
$48
0.6 Hours
May 16, 2024
Hummer H3
$174
$103
$71
0.6 Hours
May 15, 2024
Infiniti Q60
$162
$103
$59
0.6 Hours
May 15, 2024
Mazda CX-9
$170
$103
$67
0.6 Hours
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How did we estimate these prices?

Jerry's experts researched and collected data from 2500+ real repair shops in all 50 states in the US, including everything from the total cost of repair services to the hourly labor cost for mechanic labor in each shop. We combined that data with our expert database of hundreds of real repair jobs, thousands of real cars, millions of real car part prices in order to best estimate the cost of each repair service. Our labor cost estimate is calculated by taking the average hourly labor rate for a certified mechanic in the US, times the number of hours it takes on average to complete a repair. We recommend you compare your local shops with Jerry and contact those shops directly to get final pricing for your vehicle.

What parts do you need for a heater blower motor resistor replacement?

Your car’s heating and cooling systems have three things in common: they make your cabin comfortable, they help you defrost the windows, and they can’t work without the heater blower motor. If there’s no airflow coming from your vents, the total parts cost could include:
  1. A replacement heater blower motor ($40-$855): Your car’s AC unit supplies cold air, while the heating unit supplies hot air. However, neither heat nor cold will reach your cabin unless you’ve got a working, multi-speed heater blower motor to push air through the vents. Three brands we recommend are TYC, Four Seasons, and ACDelco.
  2. A new
    heater blower motor resistor
    ($9-$1,250): The electrical resistor controls the speed of the blower motor fan. When you turn the right knob or press the right button, the resistor increases or decreases the voltage it sends to the variable-speed fan, producing different levels of airflow. Brands we recommend are Standard Motor Products, Dorman, and ACDelco.
  3. A new
    heater core
    ($30-$725): The heater core repurposes the heat generated by the engine to make the car cabin nice and toasty. In doing so, it cools down the coolant, which races back to the engine to continue cooling your car so it doesn’t overheat. Recommended brands are Spectra Premium, TYC, and APDI.
  4. A replacement
    air conditioning condenser
    ($70-$880): The condenser looks like a miniature radiator. Warm, liquid refrigerant passes through to cool off before moving through the expansion valve or orifice tube. Recommended brands are Spectra Premium, TYC, and Four Seasons.
You can buy replacement heater blower motor parts for your car from auto parts stores like AutoZone, NAPA Auto Parts, and Advance Auto Parts, as well as online retailers such as Amazon and RockAuto. Keep in mind that the best options for your heater blower motor parts will vary depending on your’s year, make, and model.
Keep in mind: A faulty heater blower motor resistor could also conceal a broken motor, heater core, or AC condenser.
Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) parts cost more than aftermarket parts, but they often include better warranties. For example, a new genuine Toyota heater blower motor resistor includes a 24-month/25,000-mile warranty if it’s installed by a certified Toyota mechanic. That being said, some aftermarket performance parts manufacturers offer just as much, if not more, quality as OEM parts.
You can buy replacement parts at automotive body shops, parts shops like Advance Auto, AutoZone, NAPA Auto Parts, dealerships, or online stores like Autozone or RockAuto. If you prefer OEM parts, you can also try your vehicle manufacturer’s official website. Chevrolet, Honda, Nissan, and just about every other car maker sell OEM parts online. Check your owner’s manual for any crucial specifications so you don’t buy the wrong part.

Where can I get my heater blower motor resistor replaced?

America’s got Jerry for
cheap car insurance
, and now they can use Jerry's
GarageGuard™
for affordable auto repairs! The GarageGuard™ app makes it easy to search for a trustworthy and top-rated mechanic. Just enter “blower motor resistor replacement” into the app to discover a network of over 2,500 vetted car repair shops across the country.
You’ll be able to compare fair pricing estimates* and repair costs (including diagnostics fees and real hourly labor rates) plus verified user reviews. With Jerry's GarageGuard™, you can be confident that your car and your budget are in the right hands.
Download the app today to start shopping for car repair quotes from vetted like the ones below.
177 Reviews
54th Street Auto Center
address
415 W 54th St, New York, NY
Heater Blower Motor Resistor Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$367
(Parts - $154, Labor - $213)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$191
103 Reviews
Tveten's Lakewood Inc
address
5425 Lakewood Towne Center Blvd SW, Lakewood, WA
Heater Blower Motor Resistor Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$306
(Parts - $154, Labor - $152)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$150
109 Reviews
Logan's Automotive Mobile Service
address
2000 Towne Park Dr, McDonough, GA
Heater Blower Motor Resistor Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$240
(Parts - $154, Labor - $86)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$65
160 Reviews
O'Brien's Auto Repair LLC
address
46 Bayshore Rd, Green Creek, NJ
Heater Blower Motor Resistor Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$286
(Parts - $154, Labor - $132)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$130
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How did we vet these shops?

Jerry experts researched 2500+ real repair shops across the US. We talked to real shop customers, and analyzed both real shop pricing data and thousands of real customer reviews from each shop to verify them individually. We do not partner with the shops listed above, and our analysis is always unbiased.

How will a mechanic replace my blower motor resistor?

If you’re not comfortable dealing with wiring, a mechanic will be more than happy to perform a blower motor resistor replacement for you. Here’s what they’ll do:
  1. Inspect your car to determine whether the resistor, the motor, the connector, or the blower motor control module is at fault
  2. Access the blower motor resistor, in some cases removing the vehicle’s glove box
  3. Disconnect the wiring harness and dismount the resistor
  4. Install the new blower motor resistor
  5. Reconnect the wiring harness
  6. Reinstall the glove box (or replace the dash)
  7. Add refrigerant and replace the filter for the HVAC system (if you ask them nicely)
  8. Test the airflow through the car’s vents

Can you drive with a bad blower motor resistor?

The blower motor resistor affects more than just the blower motor speed. Without a properly functioning blower motor, your vehicle could suffer from:
  • Overheating: You shouldn't neglect the blower motor, since it diverts hot air away from the engine.
  • Reduced visibility: Your car's cooling or heating system cannot defrost the windows without airflow.
  • Malfunctioning AC or heating: Over time, your car's heater or AC can malfunction if they aren’t used.

What is a heater blower motor resistor replacement?

There is little disassembly or electronic knowledge required to replace a heater blower motor resistor. When a mechanic removes the glovebox or dash, they’ll check the electrical circuits that drive the heater blower motor, test the voltage, and replace the resistor if it’s faulty.

How do I know if I need a new blower motor resistor for my car?

If you suspect your blower motor resistor is faulty, here are the most common symptoms to look for:
  1. Your car’s AC seems to be working, but there’s no cold air coming from the vents
  2. Your car’s heater seems to be working, but there’s no hot air coming from the vents
  3. The blower motor controls aren’t working (ie. you can’t change the speed of the airflow through the vents)
  4. One of the fan speed settings doesn’t work, but others do—the classic sign of a faulty resistor.

How long should a blower motor resistor last in a car?

Although blower motor resistors are supposed to last for the life of your car, this does not always happen. Unlike brakes, car manufacturers aren't able to accurately estimate how much and when you use your blower motor resistor. Hot temperatures, high mileage, power surges, and lack of maintenance could all shorten its lifespan.

Can I replace a blower motor resistor myself?

A blower motor resistor replacement is an excellent DIY project. It’s beginner friendly, requires only basic equipment, and doesn’t take much time. You’ll need a small ratchet and socket set, plus a repair manual for your particular vehicle model. 

FAQs

You can figure out whether the blower motor or resistor is bad by determining whether the problem is with the fan or the fan speeds. A faulty resistor usually won’t let you adjust the fan speed, while a failing blower motor won’t blow any air through the vents at all. Try connecting the blower motor’s positive terminal to a voltmeter. If the fan is receiving power, the resistor is fine. If it isn’t, the resistor might be broken.
The best practice is to replace both parts of the blower motor fan assembly at the same time. They're closely linked and may wear out at the same time. In addition, it costs less to request an additional repair from a mechanic in the same area than to make two separate visits.
Overheating, power surges, and corrosion are the most common causes of blower motor resistor failure. The delicate connections around the fan assembly can be melted by overheating (perhaps caused by a faulty condenser) while power surges can blow them apart. A leak of refrigerant or coolant in the system could cause corrosion.

Meet Our Experts

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John Davis
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Car Expert
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Certified mechanic with 10+ years of experience
John Davis is an expert automotive writer and former automotive mechanic. John's work spans multiple categories, and he relishes the opportunity to research a new subject and expand his area of expertise and industry knowledge. To date, John has written more than 200 articles covering car maintenance and care, car advice, how-to guides, and more.
Prior to joining Jerry’s editorial team, John worked as a mechanic and freelance writer, creating content for clients including HotCars and SetPower.
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Jessica Barrett
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Car Expert
Jessica Barrett is a senior insurance writer and editor with 10 years of experience in the automotive and travel industries. A specialist in car insurance, car loans, and car ownership, Jessica’s mission is to create comprehensive content that car owners can use to manage their costs and improve their lives. As a managing editor for a team of writers and insurance specialists, Jessica has edited over 2,000 articles for Jerry on topics ranging from local insurance shopping tips to refinancing car loans with bad credit.
Before joining Jerry as a senior content editor in 2021, Jessica created visual content for clients such as Expedia, Vivid Seats, Budget Direct Car Insurance, Angie’s List, and HomeAdvisor. Her content was published in Business Insider, Forbes, Apartment Therapy, and the BBC.
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Kathleen Flear
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Car Expert
Kathleen Flear is an expert insurance writer and editor who heads up Jerry’s editorial team as director of content. Kathleen empowers drivers to make smart car ownership decisions through  best-in-class articles on insurance, loans, and maintenance. Prior to joining Jerry in 2021, Kathleen served as managing editor for a team of SEO content marketing professionals at Article-Writing.co and worked as a freelance writer and editor for a range of digital publications, including Chicago Literati magazine and Golden Words. She earned a bachelor’s degree in English language and literature from Queen’s University, and a master’s degree in creative writing and fiction from Sierra Nevada University.
*The price information provided on our car repair webpages is intended for general informational purposes only. Actual prices for car repair services may vary based on various factors, including but not limited to the make and model of your vehicle, the extent of repair required, and the prevailing market conditions. All prices for real repair shops are estimations based on our research only. Therefore, the prices listed on our webpages should not be considered as final quotes or binding offers.