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ABS Control Module Replacement Cost Estimate

Worried you might overpay for your ABS control module replacement? Use Jerry's GarageGuard to get fair cost estimate for your ABS control module replacement.
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John Davis
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Reviewed by Kathleen Flear, Director of Content
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Edited by Jessica Barrett, Senior Car & Insurance Editor

How much does it cost to replace an ABS control module?

The repair cost for your ABS control module can be around $868 on average, depending on the car model and year, as well as varying labor costs.
How long does it take to replace an ABS control module? Generally, it takes 1.1 hours hours to replace an ABS control module. After completion, your mechanic will inspect your brake system to ensure that all potential problems, such as faulty brake pads or ABS sensors, are addressed.
We’ve created an overview of ABS control module replacements for different car models:
Estimate DateCustomerCarFair Cost EstimateParts CostLabor CostLabor Time
May 20, 2024
Saturn Ion
$489
$443
$46
0.4 Hours
May 19, 2024
Isuzu Ascender
$1,359
$1,313
$46
0.4 Hours
May 14, 2024
GMC Sierra 2500
$1,360
$1,313
$48
0.4 Hours
May 12, 2024
Mercedes-Benz GLK
$489
$443
$46
0.4 Hours
May 10, 2024
Kia Sportage
$486
$443
$43
0.4 Hours
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How did we estimate these prices?

Jerry's experts researched and collected data from 2500+ real repair shops in all 50 states in the US, including everything from the total cost of repair services to the hourly labor cost for mechanic labor in each shop. We combined that data with our expert database of hundreds of real repair jobs, thousands of real cars, millions of real car part prices in order to best estimate the cost of each repair service. Our labor cost estimate is calculated by taking the average hourly labor rate for a certified mechanic in the US, times the number of hours it takes on average to complete a repair. We recommend you compare your local shops with Jerry and contact those shops directly to get final pricing for your vehicle.

What parts do I need for my ABS control module replacement and how much do those parts cost?

The ABS control module consists of the following parts: 
  • ABS control module: Each vehicle has an ABS control module which acts as the center of the anti-locking brake system (ABS) and manages brake pressure in combination with the ABS sensor. The average cost to replace an ABS control module replacement is $868
  • Hydraulic unit: The ABS hydraulic unit is the hub for the shift valves required for each individual wheel brake. These parts are vital for controlling brake pressure within your vehicle. Costs can range from $100 to $800 for this specific piece.
  • ABS motor: Attached to the bottom of the hydraulic unit, the ABS motor moves the pump throughout the ABS system and is only ever activated when an emergency brake event is detected. A faulty ABS motor varies in price, and will typically cost a few hundred dollars to replace. 
We recommend purchasing these parts at local auto parts stores like AutoZone, Advance Auto Parts, and O'Reilly Auto Parts, or online platforms like Amazon and eBay. We also recommend reputable brands such as Bosch, ACDelco, and Delphi for quality ABS components. However, like price, recommended brands may also vary depending on your vehicle’s specific year, make, and model.
When it comes to your ABS control system, aftermarket products are often equal to or better quality than OEMs, meaning that each component will most likely last you for a longer period of time for a fraction of the cost. However, if you’re not sure, it’s always best to consult your mechanic for additional information.
ABS control module replacement parts can be purchased at automotive body shops and automotive part stores, such as AutoZone, Advanced Auto Parts and O'Reilly Auto Parts. Additionally, required components can also be found on Amazon and Ebay for a variety of vehicles. Refer to your owner manual to find the exact parts needed for your car’s make and model.

Where can I get my ABS control module replaced?

Searching for the right location to have your ABS control module replaced can be difficult. By using Jerry's
GarageGuard™
, you can effectively compare costs from over 2,500 approved repair shops across the US. 
Jerry's GarageGuard™ compares fair price estimates* from each shop using their real hourly labor rate. That way, you’ll know if you’ll need to budget for diagnostic fees and if they’re included in services costs. To top it all off, you’ll even receive real reviews to help in your journey.
Review some of our vetted shops below and download the app to compare car repair quotes in your area.
137 Reviews
Bobby Likis Auto Service
address
5675 N Davis Hwy, Pensacola, FL
ABS Control Module Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$442
(Parts - $275, Labor - $167)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$149
152 Reviews
Olympos Auto Service
address
400 Jericho Turnpike, Mount Vernon, NY
ABS Control Module Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$434
(Parts - $275, Labor - $159)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$135
147 Reviews
Steve's Tire and Auto
address
1719 Poplar Ave, Memphis, TN
ABS Control Module Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$417
(Parts - $275, Labor - $142)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$140
153 Reviews
Uncle Ed's Oil Shoppe
address
49830 Van Dyke Ave, Shelby Township, MI
ABS Control Module Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$312
(Parts - $275, Labor - $37)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$0
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How did we vet these shops?

Jerry experts researched 2500+ real repair shops across the US. We talked to real shop customers, and analyzed both real shop pricing data and thousands of real customer reviews from each shop to verify them individually. We do not partner with the shops listed above, and our analysis is always unbiased.

How will a mechanic replace my ABS control module?

During an ABS control module replacement, your mechanic will complete a number of steps to ensure that your vehicle has a strong and reliable ABS system in place: 
  1. Confirmation: Upon arrival, your mechanic will confirm that the ABS control module needs replacing, and will assess your vehicle for other potential risks to your ABS system, such as deteriorating brake pads.
  2. Remove brake components: Next, your mechanic will remove the faulty ABS control module by releasing the brake line pressure, disconnecting the electrical connector, and removing brake lines. 
  3. Remove bolts and brackets: By removing the bolts and brackets, your mechanic is able to unhinge the module which is attached to the solenoid block. The configuration of this portion depends on your car’s make and model.
  4. Remove ABS module and replace: Once the ABS module is taken out of your vehicle and separate from the solenoid block, your mechanic will replace it with a new one by completing the above steps in reverse. 
  5. Bleed the brakes: To ensure your ABS system continues to run smoothly, it’s required to remove air from the hydraulic brake system to decrease the number of air bubbles.
  6. Replace brake fluids: After bleeding your brakes, the mechanic will then refill your brake fluids, no matter where their levels sit upon arrival. Each time an ABS control module replacement takes place, this step is required. 
  7. Inspect brake system: To conclude, your mechanic will complete one more assessment of your brake system to ensure all components are in place, secure, and risk free. 

What happens if I don’t replace my ABS control module?

If you notice your ABS control module is in need of repair, it’s better to take your vehicle for inspection as a faulty ABS control module can result in the following complications: 
  • Unresponsive brake pedal
  • Increased pedal effort and pressure
  • Locked up brakes
  • Speedometer failure
While you can still drive without a functional ABS control module—as long as there are no outstanding or current problems with your brake system—it’s encouraged that you take it to the nearest automotive body shop for repair to reduce further ABS damage.

What is an ABS control module?

The ABS control module is a component of the anti-lock brake system (ABS) that continuously checks your vehicle’s overall braking system while managing and controlling the ABS modulator. Considered the ‘hub’ of the ABS, it works in tandem with the car’s ABS sensor and hydraulic pump to increase steering control and braking.
Your normal braking system will continue to work if your ABS control module fails, but to ensure optimal system performance, repair is often required. 

When should I replace the ABS control module on my car?

You should replace the ABS control module in your car if you experience the following:
  • ABS light: If your ABS light appears on your dashboard, either intermittently or continuously, it could be a sign that your ABS control module needs replaced. Your check engine light may also turn on. 
  • Brake locking: Your ABS control system keeps your brakes from seizing even when you slam on the brakes. With a faulty ABS control module, you may experience locking brakes, preventing you from steering and making it difficult to come to a safe and complete stop.
  • Increased pressure: Finding your brake pedal is requiring more effort than usual or feels spongy? One of two things could be at play: low brake fluid or a bad ABS control module. More pressure likely means that your brakes are receiving increased amounts of fluid from the ABS unit. 
  • Incorrect speedometer: A faulty speedometer reading is dangerous, not only to yourself but to others around you, and a poor ABS control module could be the reason. When braking after traveling at high speeds, the ABS module takes control to slow your car—but without it, you won’t be able to stop your vehicle in a timely manner. 
  • Poor traction control: While driving on rain, slush, or ice covered roads, traction is of top priority. If your ABS control module is in need of repair, then it will force additional fluid into the brakes, making you lose traction. 

How often should an ABS control module be replaced? 

ABS control module repairs are less likely to occur than other vehicle repairs as a properly maintained system can last for your vehicle’s lifetime. However, if you experience unresponsive brakes, a hard brake pedal, or your ABS system light is flashing, it might be time to visit a mechanic. 

Can I replace the ABS control module myself?

Although you can replace an ABS control module yourself, it’s best to have this procedure done by a licensed mechanic as it is a complex process that sometimes requires further attention to other components, including brake pads and ABS sensor replacements.

FAQs

Yes. The ABS light is a signal from your vehicle that something may be wrong with your ABS control module, but your normal brakes will continue to work. There are a couple of reasons that this light may turn on, including
low brake fluid or a bad car battery
If you fill your brake fluid and the problem still persists, this could be a sign of a deeper problem, such as a faulty ABS control module. 
Yes. Without an ABS system in place, you won’t be able to operate your steering wheel and your brakes will lock up, prompting the car to skid in a straight line.
While you can continue to drive with a broken ABS control module, it’s recommended you have it repaired immediately to prevent additional damage and increase safety.
ABS systems decrease driver accidents, using sensors to determine when a vehicle is faced with potentially dangerous conditions (i.e. slick roads). It prevents the wheel from locking and doesn’t affect normal braking actions.
Conventional braking systems use a different system. When pressing down on the brake pedal, clamps connect with the rotors, effectively reducing speed. But when slammed in emergency scenarios, the rotors lock up, leaving the driver unable to steer. 
Whether your car has an ABS system is dependent on the year of your vehicle.
Most cars made after 2004
are equipped with ABS systems, but if your car is older than that, the best way to find out is to do a safe emergency stop. If your wheel locks, then you most likely have a conventional braking system.

Meet Our Experts

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John Davis
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Car Expert
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Certified mechanic with 10+ years of experience
John Davis is an expert automotive writer and former automotive mechanic. John's work spans multiple categories, and he relishes the opportunity to research a new subject and expand his area of expertise and industry knowledge. To date, John has written more than 200 articles covering car maintenance and care, car advice, how-to guides, and more.
Prior to joining Jerry’s editorial team, John worked as a mechanic and freelance writer, creating content for clients including HotCars and SetPower.
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Jessica Barrett
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Car Expert
Jessica Barrett is a senior insurance writer and editor with 10 years of experience in the automotive and travel industries. A specialist in car insurance, car loans, and car ownership, Jessica’s mission is to create comprehensive content that car owners can use to manage their costs and improve their lives. As a managing editor for a team of writers and insurance specialists, Jessica has edited over 2,000 articles for Jerry on topics ranging from local insurance shopping tips to refinancing car loans with bad credit.
Before joining Jerry as a senior content editor in 2021, Jessica created visual content for clients such as Expedia, Vivid Seats, Budget Direct Car Insurance, Angie’s List, and HomeAdvisor. Her content was published in Business Insider, Forbes, Apartment Therapy, and the BBC.
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Kathleen Flear
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Car Expert
Kathleen Flear is an expert insurance writer and editor who heads up Jerry’s editorial team as director of content. Kathleen empowers drivers to make smart car ownership decisions through  best-in-class articles on insurance, loans, and maintenance. Prior to joining Jerry in 2021, Kathleen served as managing editor for a team of SEO content marketing professionals at Article-Writing.co and worked as a freelance writer and editor for a range of digital publications, including Chicago Literati magazine and Golden Words. She earned a bachelor’s degree in English language and literature from Queen’s University, and a master’s degree in creative writing and fiction from Sierra Nevada University.
*The price information provided on our car repair webpages is intended for general informational purposes only. Actual prices for car repair services may vary based on various factors, including but not limited to the make and model of your vehicle, the extent of repair required, and the prevailing market conditions. All prices for real repair shops are estimations based on our research only. Therefore, the prices listed on our webpages should not be considered as final quotes or binding offers.