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Oil Cooler Hose Replacement Cost Estimate

Worried you might overpay for your oil cooler hose replacement? Use Jerry’s GarageGuard to get fair cost estimate for your oil cooler hose replacement.
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John Davis
Expert Automotive Writer
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Reviewed by Kathleen Flear, Director of Content
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Edited by Jessica Barrett, Senior Car & Insurance Editor

How much does it cost to replace an oil cooler hose?

You can expect an average total replacement cost of $171 for an oil cooler hose replacement, with $53 for parts and $118 for mechanic labor. The exact price will depend on your vehicle.
How long does it take to replace an oil cooler hose? In general, it takes around 1.0 hours for a certified mechanic to complete the job. Your mechanic will perform a preliminary inspection to determine if a replacement is necessary, then follow through with the full replacement. 
Here’s an overview of oil cooler hose average costs for different vehicles:
Oil cooler hose replacement cost for various vehicles
Estimate DateCustomerCarFair Cost EstimateParts CostLabor CostLabor Time
May 19, 2024
BMW 335
$116
$36
$80
1.0 Hours
May 18, 2024
Volvo S60
$145
$36
$108
1.0 Hours
May 15, 2024
Lexus LC
$169
$36
$133
1.0 Hours
May 10, 2024
Isuzu Trooper
$157
$36
$120
1.0 Hours
May 8, 2024
Volkswagen Touareg
$150
$36
$113
1.0 Hours
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How did we estimate these prices?

Jerry's experts researched and collected data from 2500+ real repair shops in all 50 states in the US, including everything from the total cost of repair services to the hourly labor cost for mechanic labor in each shop. We combined that data with our expert database of hundreds of real repair jobs, thousands of real cars, millions of real car part prices in order to best estimate the cost of each repair service. Our labor cost estimate is calculated by taking the average hourly labor rate for a certified mechanic in the US, times the number of hours it takes on average to complete a repair. We recommend you compare your local shops with Jerry and contact those shops directly to get final pricing for your vehicle.

What parts do I need for my oil cooler hose replacement and how much do those parts cost?

Unlike other vehicle components, the oil cooler hose is a single part. When it breaks or becomes damaged, it’s often the only part that needs to be replaced. 
Replacing an oil cooler hose is simple and affordable, with the part typically costing from $29.27 to $35.78.
If a bad oil cooler hose has been left unchecked for some time, it can cause damage to other parts of the car, which can be costly and time-consuming to fix. If there’s a problem with your cooler hose, have it looked at and replaced as soon as possible. 
You can purchase oil cooler hose parts for your car from auto parts stores like AutoZone, NAPA Auto Parts, and Advance Auto Parts, as well as online retailers such as Amazon and RockAuto. Three brands we recommend for oil cooler hose parts are Gates, Dayco, and ACDelco. However, the best parts and brands for your oil cooler hose replacement will vary depending on your vehicle’s year, make, and model.
When it comes to replacing your oil cooler hose, aftermarket hoses will suffice. Most aftermarket products are produced to the same specs as the original parts using high-quality materials, so they’ll do the same job at a lower price.
However, ensure that the new lines are built to your vehicle’s OEM standards. While aftermarket parts can be used, OEM parts are guaranteed to fit and work properly. Before buying a new hose, check the part number on your current hose and reorder the same type, as they vary by vehicle model year, make, and engine size.
You can find oil cooler hoses on online automotive parts shops like AutoZone, NAPA Auto Parts, and Advance Auto Parts. They’re also widely available on Amazon, and you’ll get them quickly! Check your owner’s manual for the specs before buying hoses.

Where can I get my oil cooler hose replaced?

With the rundown on 2,500+ vetted repair shops nationwide, Jerry's
GarageGuard™
can make the search for a mechanic to replace your oil cooler hose a lot easier.
Jerry's GarageGuard™ compares fair price estimates from local shops using actual hourly rates. You’ll be able to budget for diagnostic fees and see reviews from previous customers to make sure you’ll be happy with your service.
Here’s a look at some of our vetted shops below—and you can download the app to compare car repair quotes in your area.
146 Reviews
Northtown Auto Clinic
address
2235 Taney St, Kansas City, MO
Oil Cooler Hose Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$175
(Parts - $33, Labor - $142)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$80
187 Reviews
1DM AUTO
address
7590 McGinnis Ferry Rd, Duluth, GA
Oil Cooler Hose Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$122
(Parts - $33, Labor - $89)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$65
137 Reviews
Expert Auto Centers
address
5351 S Pulaski Rd, Chicago, IL
Oil Cooler Hose Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$138
(Parts - $33, Labor - $105)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$145
164 Reviews
J&W Motorsports
address
8850 NW 13th Terrace #104, Miami, FL
Oil Cooler Hose Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$143
(Parts - $33, Labor - $110)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$110
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How did we vet these shops?

Jerry experts researched 2500+ real repair shops across the US. We talked to real shop customers, and analyzed both real shop pricing data and thousands of real customer reviews from each shop to verify them individually. We do not partner with the shops listed above, and our analysis is always unbiased.

How will a mechanic replace my oil cooler hose?

To replace your oil cooler hose, your mechanic will usually complete the following steps:
  1. Detach the hose and drain any excess oil into an oil pan
  2. Confirm that the new and old cooler hose are the same size
  3. Install the new oil cooler hose, starting on the radiator side and then moving to the engine side
  4. Check for new leaks to ensure the new hose is in working condition
Further action may be needed if there is existing damage to the engine or transmission.

What happens if I don’t replace my oil cooler hose?

If you do not replace a broken oil cooler hose, your car’s oil will leak out, and with no lubrication, your engine is at risk of overheating due to friction. If your engine overheats, all of its essential components could be damaged.
While replacing an oil cooler hose is simple, fixing an engine is not. If your engine is
damaged
, repair costs will be significantly higher, so don’t delay fixing your broken oil cooler hose.

What is an oil cooler hose?

Your car’s oil cooler hose circulates oil between the radiator, engine, and transmission, helping to prevent the oil from overheating. The oil cools down at the radiator to continue lubricating your engine, allowing all engine parts to move smoothly without causing friction. 
Overheated oil can cause damage to your engine or transmission, so you’ll need to have a mechanic replace your broken oil cooler hose immediately.
When you go to have your oil changed, you can expect your mechanic to take a look at your oil cooler hose. If they see any signs of leakage or physical damage to the hose, they’ll let you know it’s time to replace it.

How do I know if my oil cooler hose is bad?

If your oil cooler hose is bad, there are a few common symptoms to keep an eye out for:
  1. Visible physical damage to the coolant hose: It’s occasionally a good idea to inspect under your hood, including your transmission cooler hose. If there are any signs of physical damage to the hose, have it replaced as soon as possible to prevent leakage.
  2. Leaking oil around the cooling lines: If your transmission cooler line or oil cooler hose is damaged or corroding, you may notice oil leaking around the fittings of the hose. Most oil hoses have “O” rings and gaskets that seal the compression end of the hose, and if these gaskets are damaged, the oil can leak out.
  3. Transmission overheating: When the oil cooler hose can’t do its job, it may cause the transmission to overheat. This may be due to low fluid levels from leaking or obstruction to the tube that prevents flow. An overheating transmission can stop working altogether and may cause permanent
    engine damage
    . If your transmission overheats, it typically sets off the
    check engine light
    .
  4. Deterioration in the rubber portion of the hose: If the rubber portion of the oil cooler hose starts to deteriorate, you’ll want to replace it as soon as possible. Worn rubber hoses will eventually begin to leak, leading to more serious issues.
If you have a burning smell coming from your car when driving, it could also indicate a bad oil cooler hose. When oil seeps from a damaged or loose hose, the fluid travels to the car's underside, contacting hot components and burning, thus emitting a burning smell.
Keeping up with regular car maintenance is the easiest way to avoid damage to your cooling system and, subsequently, damage to your vehicle. When you take your car in for an oil change and filter replacement, have the mechanic check the transmission oil cooler lines and hoses.

How often should an oil cooler hose be replaced?

The lifespan of an oil cooler hose is often relatively short because it’s directly in contact with hot oil. Because it constantly heats up and cools down, the hose can harden and crack, leading to oil leaks.
Although designed to last as long as your car’s engine, the hose will eventually start to wear down with exposure to heat. There’s no set interval for how often your oil cooler hose needs replacing—it depends on your vehicle and how often you drive.  

Can I replace my oil cooler hose myself?

If you’re car-savvy and looking for a new DIY project, changing the oil cooler hoses is a relatively simple process that requires just a few tools and a short amount of time. But if you’re not comfortable performing the procedure, leave the oil cooler hose replacement to a professional.  
Alternatively, depending on the age of your car, parts of the transmission cooling system may be covered under your warranty. Contact your local dealership to ask if you qualify to keep your oil cooler line replacement costs minimal!

FAQs

Oil cooler hoses are generally made from rubber or silicone and are available in various sizes and shapes to fit your vehicle’s engine configurations.
If your oil cooler hose is damaged and leaking, oil could be forced out of the engine. You’ll want to watch for leakage around the engine oil cooler lines from a damaged gasket. Any signs of physical damage to the hose itself may also indicate a leak—or one in the near future.
If the oil cooler hose is damaged, it won’t be able to cool the oil properly, causing the engine to overheat. An overheated transmission can cause many problems, including decreased vehicle performance, increased engine wear and tear, and, in extreme cases, total engine failure.

Meet Our Experts

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John Davis
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Car Expert
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Certified mechanic with 10+ years of experience
John Davis is an expert automotive writer and former automotive mechanic. John's work spans multiple categories, and he relishes the opportunity to research a new subject and expand his area of expertise and industry knowledge. To date, John has written more than 200 articles covering car maintenance and care, car advice, how-to guides, and more.
Prior to joining Jerry’s editorial team, John worked as a mechanic and freelance writer, creating content for clients including HotCars and SetPower.
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Jessica Barrett
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Car Expert
Jessica Barrett is a senior insurance writer and editor with 10 years of experience in the automotive and travel industries. A specialist in car insurance, car loans, and car ownership, Jessica’s mission is to create comprehensive content that car owners can use to manage their costs and improve their lives. As a managing editor for a team of writers and insurance specialists, Jessica has edited over 2,000 articles for Jerry on topics ranging from local insurance shopping tips to refinancing car loans with bad credit.
Before joining Jerry as a senior content editor in 2021, Jessica created visual content for clients such as Expedia, Vivid Seats, Budget Direct Car Insurance, Angie’s List, and HomeAdvisor. Her content was published in Business Insider, Forbes, Apartment Therapy, and the BBC.
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Kathleen Flear
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Car Expert
Kathleen Flear is an expert insurance writer and editor who heads up Jerry’s editorial team as director of content. Kathleen empowers drivers to make smart car ownership decisions through  best-in-class articles on insurance, loans, and maintenance. Prior to joining Jerry in 2021, Kathleen served as managing editor for a team of SEO content marketing professionals at Article-Writing.co and worked as a freelance writer and editor for a range of digital publications, including Chicago Literati magazine and Golden Words. She earned a bachelor’s degree in English language and literature from Queen’s University, and a master’s degree in creative writing and fiction from Sierra Nevada University.
*The price information provided on our car repair webpages is intended for general informational purposes only. Actual prices for car repair services may vary based on various factors, including but not limited to the make and model of your vehicle, the extent of repair required, and the prevailing market conditions. All prices for real repair shops are estimations based on our research only. Therefore, the prices listed on our webpages should not be considered as final quotes or binding offers.