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Battery Terminal Ends Replacement Cost Estimate

Worried you might overpay for your battery terminal ends replacement? Use Jerry’s GarageGuard to get fair cost estimate for your battery terminal ends replacement.
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John Davis
Expert Automotive Writer
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Reviewed by Kathleen Flear, Director of Content
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Edited by Jessica Barrett, Senior Car & Insurance Editor

How much does it cost to replace a battery terminal end?

You can expect battery terminal end replacement costs to total about $70. This includes an average cost of $11 for replacement parts and $59 for mechanic labor. The exact price will depend on your vehicle and whether you also need new battery cables and/or an entire battery replacement.
How long does it take to replace a battery terminal end? It will take your mechanic around 0.5 hours hours to remove and replace your battery terminal end. Prior to removal, your mechanic will inspect your battery to ensure no further damage occurred. 
Here’s a battery terminal end replacement cost chart to determine fair price automotive repair estimates based upon vehicle model and make. 
Estimate DateCustomerCarFair Cost EstimateParts CostLabor CostLabor Time
May 23, 2024
Mitsubishi Galant
$68
$10
$57
0.5 Hours
May 20, 2024
Subaru Impreza
$67
$10
$57
0.5 Hours
May 18, 2024
Volkswagen New
$69
$10
$59
0.5 Hours
May 15, 2024
Toyota Tacoma
$73
$10
$63
0.5 Hours
May 13, 2024
Mercedes-Benz SLK
$77
$10
$66
0.5 Hours
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How did we estimate these prices?

Jerry's experts researched and collected data from 2500+ real repair shops in all 50 states in the US, including everything from the total cost of repair services to the hourly labor cost for mechanic labor in each shop. We combined that data with our expert database of hundreds of real repair jobs, thousands of real cars, millions of real car part prices in order to best estimate the cost of each repair service. Our labor cost estimate is calculated by taking the average hourly labor rate for a certified mechanic in the US, times the number of hours it takes on average to complete a repair. We recommend you compare your local shops with Jerry and contact those shops directly to get final pricing for your vehicle.

What parts do I need for my battery terminal end replacement and how much do those parts cost?

You can check your owner’s manual or ask your mechanic for your manufacturer’s recommended parts, but here’s a general rundown:
  1. Battery cable terminals: Your car’s electrical system includes both a negative battery terminal and a positive battery terminal, which is why these are almost always sold in pairs. These usually cost around $8 to $15 dollars.
  2. Anti-corrosion spray: Whether you go with WD-40 or Vaseline, coating your new terminal ends with an anti-corrosive can make maintenance easier down the road. A can of WD-40 usually costs between $15 and $25 depending on size.
  3. Heat-shrink tubing: To help secure and protect the connection between your new terminals and the battery cables, we recommend heat-shrink tubing. You can also use electrical tape, but it can wear and loosen over time. Heat-shrink tubing is a simple, long-lasting alternative that usually costs less than $10 for over 100 pieces.
You can buy battery terminal end parts for your vehicle at auto parts stores like AutoZone, Advance Auto Parts, and NAPA Auto Parts, or through online retailers like Amazon and eBay. Three brands we recommend for battery terminal ends include ACDelco, Dorman, and Schumacher. Keep in mind that prices will vary depending on your vehicle’s year, make, and model.
For a battery terminal replacement, both OEM and aftermarket parts are usable. OEM products are higher cost, but come directly from the manufacturer, thus ensuring quality and fit. However, aftermarket parts are often the more cost-friendly option, but still provide a comparable quality to their OEM counterparts.
Most battery terminal ends can be purchased from auto parts stores and auto repair shops like AutoZone, NAPA Auto Parts, or Advance Auto Parts. They are also available through online retailers such as Amazon or eBay. Refer to your owner’s manual for further information to help you select the right battery terminal end for your vehicle.

Where can I get my battery terminal ends replaced?

It isn’t easy finding the right mechanic for your car repair needs, especially at a budget-friendly cost.
Jerry’s GarageGuard™
gets real hourly labor rates from over 2,500 verified mechanics to help you compare fair price repair estimates*.
Jerry’s GarageGuard™ also provides additional information on diagnostic costs (and whether they’re included in your service) as well as real reviews, so you’re fully informed when making all car repair decisions.
Review some of our vetted shops below and get the app to compare car repair costs in your area. 
186 Reviews
South Bay Auto Repair and Transmissions
address
1120 Aviation Blvd, Manhattan Beach, CA
Battery Terminal Ends Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$130
(Parts - $5, Labor - $125)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$75
190 Reviews
Pep Boys Auto Parts & Service - Metairie #161
address
6638 Veterans Memorial Blvd, New Orleans, LA
Battery Terminal Ends Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$142
(Parts - $5, Labor - $137)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$100
187 Reviews
Euro-Tech
address
5937 Belair Rd, Baltimore, MD
Battery Terminal Ends Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$100
(Parts - $5, Labor - $95)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$135
154 Reviews
61 Auto Center
address
1226 Centre Ave, Reading, PA
Battery Terminal Ends Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$55
(Parts - $5, Labor - $50)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$70
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How did we vet these shops?

Jerry experts researched 2500+ real repair shops across the US. We talked to real shop customers, and analyzed both real shop pricing data and thousands of real customer reviews from each shop to verify them individually. We do not partner with the shops listed above, and our analysis is always unbiased.

How will a mechanic replace my battery terminal end?

To successfully complete a battery terminal end replacement, your mechanic will first conduct an inspection of your car battery and charging system. Then, they will follow these steps: 
  1. Disconnect battery terminal ends: To start, your mechanic will disconnect the battery by starting with the negative terminal and removing the terminal ends from the battery posts. The mechanic will then check both the negative and positive terminal ends for battery corrosion and damage to determine if the connectors need replacement or simple cleaning. 
  2. Remove battery terminal ends: If new terminals are warranted, your mechanic will fully remove the old terminal end from the battery cable and install a new one. During this step, the new battery terminal end is connected to the battery cables and car battery. 
  3. Coat with protection spray: To prevent further corrosion or potential damage, a coat of protective spray will be applied to your new battery terminal end.
  4. Test: As with all car repairs, your mechanic will finally run a test of your vehicle to ensure the proper operation of the battery terminal. 

What happens if I don’t replace my battery terminal end?

If you don’t regularly inspect your battery terminal ends, you can face several complications with your car’s battery system. Neglecting your battery terminal ends can result in: 
  • Reduced alternator output
  • Battery draining problems
  • Increased electrical problems
  • Decreased battery performance

What is a battery terminal end?

Battery cable terminal ends, or battery terminal connectors, connect your battery cables and entire electrical system to the central battery. They act as the main point of contact between the car battery and the electrical system, and without them, your car can’t function properly. Battery terminal ends come in a variety of shapes and sizes, so it’s important to review your owner’s manual to help in selecting the right battery terminal end for your vehicle.

When should I replace the battery terminal end on my car?

It’s not necessary for battery terminal ends to be replaced on a regular basis—most often, they just need to be cleaned and cared for through regular maintenance. However, if your battery terminal ends need to be replaced, there are a few common signs to look for: 
  1. Difficulty starting your vehicle: If your vehicle won’t start, and/or you see the battery light illuminated on your vehicle’s dashboard, this could be due to a deteriorated battery terminal end. To troubleshoot, lift the hood, identify the battery, and examine the terminals for corrosion or damage.
  2. Decreased electrical power: Another symptom of bad battery terminal ends is decreased electrical power. Flickering headlights, inconsistent audio or navigation system function, or a dim dashboard are all signs of electrical power loss, and your battery terminals might be the problem.
  3. Sudden battery drain: When your car dies suddenly, this could be a result of poor battery terminal ends. Since battery terminal ends help supply power to your car’s battery, if they are impacted, so is the rest of your car’s battery system.
  4. Electrical system failure: This is a large symptom that tells you that your battery terminal ends need repair or replacement. Without the flow of electricity your battery terminal ends supply, all of your car’s electrical systems will be affected due to increased resistance in the circuit. 
  5. Hot negative battery cable: A hot to the touch negative battery cable is also a sign of a poor battery terminal end. This means that the battery terminals are not connecting with the posts. This issue can be a result of corrosion, loose connections, or damage to the terminals.

How often should a battery terminal end be replaced?

Most battery terminal ends will last for 50,000 to 100,000 miles before needing replacement. The best way to ensure your battery’s lifespan and overall health is to routinely inspect your battery terminal ends for corrosion or instability. Damaged, deteriorated or corroded battery terminal ends can break the connection from the terminal and engine, stopping your car from turning on. 

Can I replace my battery terminal end myself?

Yes, but you may not need to. Oftentimes, battery terminal ends don’t need to be replaced—rather they need cleaning. If you use a wire brush to clear all residue and corrosion from your battery terminal ends and the problem still persists, it may be a problem with the car battery cables or the charging system. In this instance, it’s better to take your vehicle to a licensed mechanic for additional assistance. 

FAQs

Loose battery terminal ends can cause a disruption in the electrical components of your vehicle causing it to stall or run erratically. If your battery terminal end comes loose while driving, it’s important to pull safely to the side of the road. If you don’t have the tools handy to tighten the battery terminal ends yourself, call for roadside assistance.
When cleaning a battery terminal end, the most common products used are baking soda and water—but not in a mixture form. Instead, start by pouring baking soda directly onto the battery terminal ends and then dip a soft cleaning brush into a container of water to gently rub the baking soda in.
Yes. WD-40 helps prevent corrosion, and therefore, can be used on battery terminals. Make sure to wipe with a clean cloth after spraying.

Meet Our Experts

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John Davis
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Car Expert
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Certified mechanic with 10+ years of experience
John Davis is an expert automotive writer and former automotive mechanic. John's work spans multiple categories, and he relishes the opportunity to research a new subject and expand his area of expertise and industry knowledge. To date, John has written more than 200 articles covering car maintenance and care, car advice, how-to guides, and more.
Prior to joining Jerry’s editorial team, John worked as a mechanic and freelance writer, creating content for clients including HotCars and SetPower.
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Jessica Barrett
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Car Expert
Jessica Barrett is a senior insurance writer and editor with 10 years of experience in the automotive and travel industries. A specialist in car insurance, car loans, and car ownership, Jessica’s mission is to create comprehensive content that car owners can use to manage their costs and improve their lives. As a managing editor for a team of writers and insurance specialists, Jessica has edited over 2,000 articles for Jerry on topics ranging from local insurance shopping tips to refinancing car loans with bad credit.
Before joining Jerry as a senior content editor in 2021, Jessica created visual content for clients such as Expedia, Vivid Seats, Budget Direct Car Insurance, Angie’s List, and HomeAdvisor. Her content was published in Business Insider, Forbes, Apartment Therapy, and the BBC.
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Kathleen Flear
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Car Expert
Kathleen Flear is an expert insurance writer and editor who heads up Jerry’s editorial team as director of content. Kathleen empowers drivers to make smart car ownership decisions through  best-in-class articles on insurance, loans, and maintenance. Prior to joining Jerry in 2021, Kathleen served as managing editor for a team of SEO content marketing professionals at Article-Writing.co and worked as a freelance writer and editor for a range of digital publications, including Chicago Literati magazine and Golden Words. She earned a bachelor’s degree in English language and literature from Queen’s University, and a master’s degree in creative writing and fiction from Sierra Nevada University.
*The price information provided on our car repair webpages is intended for general informational purposes only. Actual prices for car repair services may vary based on various factors, including but not limited to the make and model of your vehicle, the extent of repair required, and the prevailing market conditions. All prices for real repair shops are estimations based on our research only. Therefore, the prices listed on our webpages should not be considered as final quotes or binding offers.