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Barometric Sensor Replacement Cost Estimate

Worried you might overpay for your barometric sensor replacement? Use Jerry’s GarageGuard to get fair cost estimate for your barometric sensor replacement.
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John Davis
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Reviewed by Kathleen Flear, Director of Content
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Edited by Jessica Barrett, Senior Car & Insurance Editor

How much does it cost to replace a barometric pressure sensor?

General estimated repair costs for a barometric pressure sensor replacement are about $166, with parts priced at $99 and labor costs of $68.
Keep in mind: The barometric sensor (or baro sensor for short) replacement cost will vary depending on the make and model of your car, as well as changing labor fees. 
How long does it take to replace a barometric sensor? To complete a barometric sensor replacement on your car, it will generally take your mechanic about 0.6 hours hours. Before beginning the process, your mechanic will also assess your car’s engine to determine if further damage has occurred.
Below is a barometric sensor replacement chart highlighting the fair price repair estimates for your specific vehicle. 
Estimate DateCustomerCarFair Cost EstimateParts CostLabor CostLabor Time
June 14, 2024
Saturn L100
$106
$72
$33
0.3 Hours
June 13, 2024
Genesis G80
$106
$72
$34
0.3 Hours
June 12, 2024
Eagle Talon
$113
$72
$40
0.3 Hours
June 10, 2024
Mitsubishi Lancer
$107
$72
$34
0.3 Hours
June 9, 2024
Volkswagen New
$110
$72
$38
0.3 Hours
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How did we estimate these prices?

Jerry's experts researched and collected data from 2500+ real repair shops in all 50 states in the US, including everything from the total cost of repair services to the hourly labor cost for mechanic labor in each shop. We combined that data with our expert database of hundreds of real repair jobs, thousands of real cars, millions of real car part prices in order to best estimate the cost of each repair service. Our labor cost estimate is calculated by taking the average hourly labor rate for a certified mechanic in the US, times the number of hours it takes on average to complete a repair. We recommend you compare your local shops with Jerry and contact those shops directly to get final pricing for your vehicle.

What parts do I need for my barometric sensor replacement and how much do those parts cost?

The exact parts associated with a barometric sensor replacement vary depending on the make and model of the vehicle. In general, you’ll need the following parts: 
  1. Barometric sensor: Barometric sensors are usually found in the engine compartment or near the intake manifold, and its are the main component that needs to be replaced. The price of a barometric sensor depends on the exact vehicle make and model, but these parts generally cost $30 to $100.  
  2. Electrical connector: Your barometric sensor will need a new electrical connector. These connectors typically come with new sensors, but if you have to purchase one separately, it could cost $20 to $35 on average.
  3. Screwdriver or socket wrench: The fasteners and connectors associated with your barometric sensor will need to be removed with a screwdriver or socket wrench for the replacement. Screwdrivers and socket wrenches can cost anywhere between $10 to $30.
  4. Dielectric grease: Dielectric grease is used to protect the barometric sensor’s electrical connections from corroding or wearing. Dielectric grease typically costs $15.
You can buy barometric sensor parts for your car from auto parts stores like AutoZone, Advance Auto Parts, and O'Reilly Auto Parts, as well as online retailers such as Amazon and eBay. Three of our recommended brands for barometric sensor parts are Standard Motor Products, ACDelco, and Delphi. However, the best parts and brands for your vehicle’s replacement depends on its year, make, and model.
When it comes to barometric sensor replacements, OEM parts are recommended simply for their longevity. As baro sensors are meant to last the lifespan of your car, OEM products will only need to be replaced less frequently. Although aftermarket auto parts are lower cost, they will require replacement several times over the course of your vehicle’s life.
Barometric sensor replacement parts can be purchased in-store or online across several auto body repair shops, like AutoZone, Advance Auto Parts, and O'Reilly Auto Parts. Third-party retailers such as Amazon also carry baro sensors, however, it’s important to consult your owner’s manual before purchase to determine the correct pressure reading sensor for your vehicle.

Where can I get my barometric sensor replaced?

Searching for an exact cost for your barometric sensor replacement can be tiring. To help, Jerry's
GarageGuard™
uses real hourly labor rates from over 2,500 auto body shops in the US to determine fair price repair estimates*. 
From there, Jerry's GarageGuard™ is able to get access to potential diagnostic costs (and whether they’re included in your service fees) and even supplies real reviews to help you choose the right service for your car. 
Read about some of our vetted shops below, and get the app so you can see car repair quotes in your area.
123 Reviews
BBC Auto Repair
address
42 Joy St, Somerville, MA
Barometric Sensor Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$159
(Parts - $74, Labor - $85)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$0
129 Reviews
Accurate Smog & Auto Repair
address
7060 Schirra Ct #101, Bakersfield, CA
Barometric Sensor Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$184
(Parts - $74, Labor - $110)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$140
198 Reviews
Harrell's Auto Service - Gillespie
address
1128 Gillespie St, Fayetteville, NC
Barometric Sensor Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$184
(Parts - $74, Labor - $110)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$129.99
187 Reviews
1DM AUTO
address
7590 McGinnis Ferry Rd, Duluth, GA
Barometric Sensor Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$163
(Parts - $74, Labor - $89)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$65
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How did we vet these shops?

Jerry experts researched 2500+ real repair shops across the US. We talked to real shop customers, and analyzed both real shop pricing data and thousands of real customer reviews from each shop to verify them individually. We do not partner with the shops listed above, and our analysis is always unbiased.

How will a mechanic replace my barometric sensor?

When replacing your car’s barometric sensor, your mechanic will begin with an inspection to make sure that your engine control unit (ECU) is working correctly. From there, they will follow these core steps: 
  1. Verify location and remove: First, your mechanic will locate your barometric sensor. These locations will be different based on your car’s make and model. Once they find the barometric sensor, they will disconnect it and install a new one in the same place.
  2. Bypass: If you’re using an aftermarket barometric sensor, your mechanic may need to bypass the old sensor. To do so, they will splice the power wire from the new sensor and replace it with the old sensor’s power wire.
  3. Establish vacuum source: Next, your mechanic will identify a vacuum source for the sensor. Then, they will connect the vacuum line to the heat source and then attach the sensor to the correct power source.
  4. Cable connections: Once the above steps are complete, your mechanic will fasten cables to each of the five connections on the breakout board, as well as the SDA pin. 
  5. Calibrate: After your new barometric sensor is in place and secure, your mechanic will calibrate it to ensure accurate readings of your car’s pressure levels.
  6. Test: Upon completion, a routine test will be conducted to determine the proper operation of the barometric sensor.

What happens if I don’t replace my barometric sensor?

If you don’t replace your barometric sensor, you can cause serious internal damage to your vehicle. Some common problems associated with not replacing your barometric sensor are:
  • Too much air pressure, causing your vehicle to run lean
  • Little fuel efficiency  
  • Overall engine damage
  • Lack of power/stalling (potential battery draining problem)

What is a barometric sensor?

Barometric sensors (otherwise known as pressure sensors) read the barometric pressure within your car. It then uses this information to adjust the fuel trim and engine timing to avoid an excess amount of air and incorrect fuel levels. Common problems associated with failure in barometric sensors include exposure to the elements, leading to deterioration. 

When should I replace the barometric sensor on my car?

It’s not often that a barometric sensor needs to be replaced. However, if you are experiencing the following common problems, it might be worth taking your vehicle to a licensed mechanic: 
  1. Poor engine performance: If your vehicle is sluggish, taking longer to accelerate, or is just lacking in overall power, the answer is most likely your barometric sensor. When the readings and signals from your barometric sensor are compromised, the computer calculations for your car are also in flux, resulting in less power.
  2. Check engine light: Anytime your check engine light is illuminated, it’s best to pull over and assess/test your vehicle, as it could be alerting you to a potential problem. A faulty barometric sensor will cause your check engine to light up, have your vehicle inspected by a mechanic. 
Keep in mind: The changes above could also be caused by MAP sensor failure. The manifold absolute pressure sensor monitors intake manifold pressure to calculate the correct fuel injection ratio. MAP sensor replacement costs are similar to baro sensor replacement costs.

How often should a barometric sensor be replaced?

A barometric sensor is designed to last the length of your car. Therefore, repairs are only required if early deterioration happens, which is more likely than the part aging out. However, it’s recommended to have your barometric sensor calibrated periodically to achieve the highest level of accuracy in its readings. 

Can I replace my barometric sensor myself?

Yes, you can replace a barometric sensor yourself, but it’s not advised. Be aware that a barometric sensor removal and installation is a multi-step process that requires a mid to intermediate level understanding of cable connections, calibration, and voltage. If you’re not confident in these areas or general car repair, it’s best to visit a licensed mechanic. 

FAQs

No, you can’t drive with a failing or faulty barometric sensor. Continued use of your vehicle will cause it to produce incorrect amounts of air and fuel mixtures, leading to further complications with your car’s engine.
While driving, your vehicle will experience different atmospheric conditions. Higher altitudes will provide less oxygen for your engine, which requires a different amount of fuel. The barometric sensor determines the pressure from outside of your vehicle’s engine to identify the best fuel conditions and timing for the best overall performance.
No. MAP/MAF sensors calculate the air flow and provide data to the engine control module to optimize performance. The barometric sensor recognizes and records atmospheric pressure to correctly adjust fuel and air density levels for optimal fuel consumption. However, the symptoms of a bad MAP sensor are similar to the signs of a failing barometric sensor.

Meet Our Experts

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John Davis
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Car Expert
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Certified mechanic with 10+ years of experience
John Davis is an expert automotive writer and former automotive mechanic. John's work spans multiple categories, and he relishes the opportunity to research a new subject and expand his area of expertise and industry knowledge. To date, John has written more than 200 articles covering car maintenance and care, car advice, how-to guides, and more.
Prior to joining Jerry’s editorial team, John worked as a mechanic and freelance writer, creating content for clients including HotCars and SetPower.
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Jessica Barrett
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Car Expert
Jessica Barrett is a senior insurance writer and editor with 10 years of experience in the automotive and travel industries. A specialist in car insurance, car loans, and car ownership, Jessica’s mission is to create comprehensive content that car owners can use to manage their costs and improve their lives. As a managing editor for a team of writers and insurance specialists, Jessica has edited over 2,000 articles for Jerry on topics ranging from local insurance shopping tips to refinancing car loans with bad credit.
Before joining Jerry as a senior content editor in 2021, Jessica created visual content for clients such as Expedia, Vivid Seats, Budget Direct Car Insurance, Angie’s List, and HomeAdvisor. Her content was published in Business Insider, Forbes, Apartment Therapy, and the BBC.
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Kathleen Flear
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Car Expert
Kathleen Flear is an expert insurance writer and editor who heads up Jerry’s editorial team as director of content. Kathleen empowers drivers to make smart car ownership decisions through  best-in-class articles on insurance, loans, and maintenance. Prior to joining Jerry in 2021, Kathleen served as managing editor for a team of SEO content marketing professionals at Article-Writing.co and worked as a freelance writer and editor for a range of digital publications, including Chicago Literati magazine and Golden Words. She earned a bachelor’s degree in English language and literature from Queen’s University, and a master’s degree in creative writing and fiction from Sierra Nevada University.
*The price information provided on our car repair webpages is intended for general informational purposes only. Actual prices for car repair services may vary based on various factors, including but not limited to the make and model of your vehicle, the extent of repair required, and the prevailing market conditions. All prices for real repair shops are estimations based on our research only. Therefore, the prices listed on our webpages should not be considered as final quotes or binding offers.