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Automatic Shutdown Relay Replacement Cost Estimate

Worried you might overpay for your automatic shutdown relay replacement? Use Jerry’s GarageGuard to get fair cost estimate for your automatic shutdown relay replacement.
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John Davis
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Reviewed by Kathleen Flear, Director of Content
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Edited by Jessica Barrett, Senior Car & Insurance Editor

How much does it cost to replace an automatic shutdown relay?

Generally, automatic shutdown relay replacements cost an average of $70. Both parts and labor costs range depending on your car’s make and model, with parts costing around $10and labor fees of $61
For an exact automatic shutdown relay replacement cost for your specific vehicle, contact your mechanic.
How long does it take to replace an automatic shutdown relay? Auto shutdown relay replacements take an average of 0.5 hours. Your mechanic will check your automatic shutdown relay socket terminals when completing the routine inspection to ensure that there is no corrosion or broken wires. If a problem is discovered, this may also impact pricing. 
Here’s a detailed automatic shutdown relay replacement cost table to help you determine the fair price repair estimates:
Estimate DateCustomerCarFair Cost EstimateParts CostLabor CostLabor Time
May 22, 2024
Buick Encore
$45
$11
$35
0.3 Hours
May 20, 2024
Dodge Charger
$48
$11
$37
0.3 Hours
May 18, 2024
Mini Cooper
$51
$11
$40
0.3 Hours
May 16, 2024
Pontiac Grand Am
$46
$11
$35
0.3 Hours
May 11, 2024
Alfa Romeo Stelvio
$46
$11
$36
0.3 Hours
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How did we estimate these prices?

Jerry's experts researched and collected data from 2500+ real repair shops in all 50 states in the US, including everything from the total cost of repair services to the hourly labor cost for mechanic labor in each shop. We combined that data with our expert database of hundreds of real repair jobs, thousands of real cars, millions of real car part prices in order to best estimate the cost of each repair service. Our labor cost estimate is calculated by taking the average hourly labor rate for a certified mechanic in the US, times the number of hours it takes on average to complete a repair. We recommend you compare your local shops with Jerry and contact those shops directly to get final pricing for your vehicle.

What parts do I need for my automatic shutdown relay replacement and how much do those parts cost?

You can check your owner’s manual or ask your mechanic for precise parts, but here’s a general rundown:
  1. Automatic shutdown relay: You can check your vehicle’s owner’s manual for precise parts based on your automatic shutdown relay number. On average, your automatic shutdown relay will cost $10 to $50.
  2. Screwdrivers: Automatic shutdown relays are usually secured in a mounted position by screws and bolts. You’ll need a screwdriver to remove the mounting hardware, which usually costs $7 to $30.
  3. Electrical connectors: Wire connectors are necessary to ensure the automatic shutdown relay’s electrical connections are properly secured. Wire connectors can cost up to $40. 
  4. Wire crimping tool: If your wire connectors need to be crimped, you'll need the correct crimping tool. Wire crimping tools cost between $15 to $40.
You can purchase automatic shutdown relay parts for your car from auto parts stores like AutoZone, NAPA Auto Parts, and Advance Auto Parts, as well as online retailers such as Amazon and RockAuto. Three of our recommended brands for automatic shutdown relay parts are Standard Motor Products, ACDelco, and Bosch. However, the best parts and brands for your replacement will vary depending on your vehicle’s year, make, and model.
When looking to replace your automatic shutdown relay, you can purchase either OEM or aftermarket parts. While OEM parts are designed specifically for your vehicle and tend to be of higher quality, aftermarket products are more cost-efficient.
Auto shutdown relay parts are available at both auto body and auto part shops like AutoZone, NAPA Auto Parts, and Advance Auto Parts, online and in-store. Similarly, websites like Amazon also sell automatic shutdown relay replacements at a valued price. Make sure to refer to your owner’s manual before checkout to help in making the correct purchase for your vehicle.

Where can I get my automatic shutdown relay replaced?

When looking to repair your auto shutdown relay, finding the right mechanic can be a challenge. There are several options, all at different prices. Luckily, Jerry's GarageGuard™ has you covered. 
Jerry's GarageGuard™ compares fair price repair estimates* across over 2,500 repair shops in the US to determine real hourly labor rates. Using this data, Jerry's GarageGuard™ can continue to provide further information, such as diagnostic costs and whether or not they’re included in the quoted service fee. 
Additionally, all customers will get real reviews from real customers, so you can effectively determine the best mechanic for your upcoming car repair.  
Review a few of our vetted shops below, and get the app to continue to compare exact costs in your area.
190 Reviews
LBR Auto Repair
address
13030 Bel-Red Rd, Bellevue, WA
Automatic Shutdown Relay Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$147
(Parts - $10, Labor - $137)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$159
127 Reviews
Ingleside Auto & Tire Care
address
34811 N Wilson Rd, Ingleside, IL
Automatic Shutdown Relay Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$165
(Parts - $10, Labor - $155)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$0
138 Reviews
Curbee
address
599 N 4th St, Oakland, CA
Automatic Shutdown Relay Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$135
(Parts - $10, Labor - $125)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$135
162 Reviews
Blue Piston Auto Repair
address
319 W Vine St, Salt Lake City, UT
Automatic Shutdown Relay Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$105
(Parts - $10, Labor - $95)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$0
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How did we vet these shops?

Jerry experts researched 2500+ real repair shops across the US. We talked to real shop customers, and analyzed both real shop pricing data and thousands of real customer reviews from each shop to verify them individually. We do not partner with the shops listed above, and our analysis is always unbiased.

How will a mechanic replace my automatic shutdown relay?

If you opt to take your vehicle to a mechanic, they will look underhood and take the following steps to complete an automatic shutdown relay replacement:
  1. Locate the fuse relay: Your owner’s manual will be able to tell you exactly where your fuse box and starter relay are located for your car. However, your mechanic might already know this information based on your vehicle’s make and model, and can quickly identify where your fuse relay is situated.
  2. Find the proper relay: As the relay panel in your car generally holds more than one relay, it’s important to know which one is your automatic shutdown. Your mechanic will search your relay panel to determine which is the proper piece to remove in the control module.
  3. Remove automatic shutdown relay: Once your mechanic locates your automatic shutdown relay, they will remove it carefully to avoid further damage. After removal, your mechanic will then replace the defective automatic shutdown relay with a new one.
  4. Test run: After replacing your automatic shutdown relay, your mechanic will conduct a test run with your vehicle to make sure that all parts are correctly working and your car is able to turn on.
Keep in mind: If you are conducting an automatic shutdown relay replacement on your own, be careful of bending or damaging the terminal or connection when installing. The automatic shutdown relay should easily insert itself into place, much like a standard housing electrical plug.

What happens if I don’t replace my automatic shutdown relay?

Not replacing your automatic shutdown relay can lead to your car becoming inoperable. Common problems of a neglected automatic shutdown relay include: 
  • Engine stalls
  • Stagnant car due to dead alternator
  • Car battery draining problems
  • Engine failure

What is an automatic shutdown relay?

An automatic shutdown relay (ASD) is an electrical switch that helps provide power to your vehicle and is connected to your ignition system. 
When the ignition switch  is in the “OFF” position, the automatic shutdown relay prevents any power from reaching other major components of your car, like the fuel pump relay. 
When you turn your ignition switch into the “ON” position, power is then supplied to all electrical components, the fuel pump, and the injectors—but only during cranking. After you let go, it’s turned off again, preserving your fuel system. 

When should I replace the automatic shutdown relay on my car?

You should replace the automatic shutdown relay on your car when you see clear deterioration, or when you experience the following symptoms: 
  1. Stalling vehicle: This is the most common problem associated with a failing automatic shutdown relay. The engine often starts, but stalls out almost instantly. With a faulty starter relay, power is unable to reach different circuits and parts of your car, meaning it might be time to have it replaced. 
  2. Engine doesn’t turn on: Another symptom of a depleting starter relay is an engine that just won’t start. This most likely means that the power required to juice up your battery isn’t reaching it, leaving your car stagnant. Similarly, a dead battery is another sign that your main relay may need tending to. 
  3. Check engine light: One simple way to determine any automotive complications is if your dashboard is illuminated. If your ASD relay isn’t functioning properly, the check engine light will turn on, alerting you of a potential problem. 
  4. Lag while accelerating: Lag can appear as a sign that your automatic shutdown relay is in need of replacement. If the ASD relay is damaged, then the other components can drop in voltage. However, this symptom doesn’t happen as frequently. 

How often should an automatic shutdown relay be replaced?

Most automatic shutdown relays last up to 50,000 cycles, or the lifespan of your vehicle. However, this depends on various factors like how often you drive. If you drive more regularly than the average commuter, it’s possible that this could wear down your automatic shutdown relay faster than expected.

Can I replace my automatic shutdown relay myself?

Yes, as the procedure is fairly straightforward and can be completed in your driveway. Using your owner’s manual, you should easily be able to get to your automatic shutdown relay. However, if you’re unsure of the location or not confident in your ability to complete an automatic shutdown relay replacement, it’s best to take your vehicle to a licensed mechanic for further assistance. 

FAQs

No, you cannot drive with a bad automatic shutdown relay. Your vehicle may turn on for a time, but it will most likely shut down seconds or minutes later due to battery draining problems and lack of power. If you have a faulty ASD relay, call a professional mechanic to have it inspected further.
There are many different factors that can cause a relay to fail earlier than anticipated. Some common problems include mechanical wear and contamination (metallic and non-metallic). If your ASD relay lasts the lifespan of your car, mechanical wear over time is the most likely cause for failure.
If you suspect your ASD relay is about to expire, you can test it yourself in a few steps. 
Make sure your car is in the “ON” position and remove the relay from the connector before testing:
  1. Resistance check: Get an ohmmeter to determine the resistance between terminals 85 and 86 of the relay—this result should be around 70-80 ohms.
  2. Connecting ohmmeter: Next, attach your ohmmeter in the middle of relay terminals 30 and 87A and check for continuity between the two. 
  3. Jumper wire to ground: Connect one end of a jumper wire (16 gauge and up) to relay terminal 85. During this stage, the ohmmeter shouldn’t show an open circuit. Connect the other end of the jumper wire to the ground side of a 12 volt power source. 
  4. Jumper wire to power: Grab another jumper wire and attach one end to the power side of the 12 volt power source. It’s important to not let the ohmmeter to contact terminals 85 and 86 during this test. Connect the other end to relay terminal 86 to turn on the relay. If done correctly, the ohmmeter should show continuity between 87 and 30, and not between 87A and 30.
  5. Disconnect: Finally, disconnect all wires. If your ASD relay needs to be replaced, the ohmmeter will not pass the continuity test.

Meet Our Experts

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John Davis
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Car Expert
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Certified mechanic with 10+ years of experience
John Davis is an expert automotive writer and former automotive mechanic. John's work spans multiple categories, and he relishes the opportunity to research a new subject and expand his area of expertise and industry knowledge. To date, John has written more than 200 articles covering car maintenance and care, car advice, how-to guides, and more.
Prior to joining Jerry’s editorial team, John worked as a mechanic and freelance writer, creating content for clients including HotCars and SetPower.
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Jessica Barrett
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Car Expert
Jessica Barrett is a senior insurance writer and editor with 10 years of experience in the automotive and travel industries. A specialist in car insurance, car loans, and car ownership, Jessica’s mission is to create comprehensive content that car owners can use to manage their costs and improve their lives. As a managing editor for a team of writers and insurance specialists, Jessica has edited over 2,000 articles for Jerry on topics ranging from local insurance shopping tips to refinancing car loans with bad credit.
Before joining Jerry as a senior content editor in 2021, Jessica created visual content for clients such as Expedia, Vivid Seats, Budget Direct Car Insurance, Angie’s List, and HomeAdvisor. Her content was published in Business Insider, Forbes, Apartment Therapy, and the BBC.
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Kathleen Flear
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Car Expert
Kathleen Flear is an expert insurance writer and editor who heads up Jerry’s editorial team as director of content. Kathleen empowers drivers to make smart car ownership decisions through  best-in-class articles on insurance, loans, and maintenance. Prior to joining Jerry in 2021, Kathleen served as managing editor for a team of SEO content marketing professionals at Article-Writing.co and worked as a freelance writer and editor for a range of digital publications, including Chicago Literati magazine and Golden Words. She earned a bachelor’s degree in English language and literature from Queen’s University, and a master’s degree in creative writing and fiction from Sierra Nevada University.
*The price information provided on our car repair webpages is intended for general informational purposes only. Actual prices for car repair services may vary based on various factors, including but not limited to the make and model of your vehicle, the extent of repair required, and the prevailing market conditions. All prices for real repair shops are estimations based on our research only. Therefore, the prices listed on our webpages should not be considered as final quotes or binding offers.