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Oil Pump O-Ring Replacement Cost Estimate

Worried you might overpay for your oil pump o-ring replacement? Use Jerry’s GarageGuard to get fair a cost estimate for your oil pump o-ring replacement.
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John Davis
Expert Automotive Writer
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Reviewed by Kathleen Flear, Director of Content
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Edited by Jessica Barrett, Senior Car & Insurance Editor

How much does it cost to replace the oil pump O-ring?

In most cases, the total cost to replace an oil pump O-ring will be $708. This will include $232 in parts and $476 in labor. Your vehicle's make and model could affect the final price.
When performed by a trained mechanic, changing the O-ring on an oil pump typically takes 4.0 hours hours. The mechanic will determine if a replacement is necessary before beginning any work.
The estimated cost to replace the oil pump O-ring for various vehicle types is listed below.
Estimate DateCustomerCarFair Cost EstimateParts CostLabor CostLabor Time
May 25, 2024
Infiniti I30
$480
$77
$402
3.3 Hours
May 20, 2024
Porsche Macan
$515
$77
$437
3.3 Hours
May 19, 2024
Saab 45172
$447
$69
$378
3.3 Hours
May 17, 2024
Dodge Neon
$640
$238
$401
3.3 Hours
May 17, 2024
Geo Prizm
$640
$238
$401
3.3 Hours
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How did we estimate these prices?

Jerry's experts researched and collected data from 2500+ real repair shops in all 50 states in the US, including everything from the total cost of repair services to the hourly labor cost for mechanic labor in each shop. We combined that data with our expert database of hundreds of real repair jobs, thousands of real cars, millions of real car part prices in order to best estimate the cost of each repair service. Our labor cost estimate is calculated by taking the average hourly labor rate for a certified mechanic in the US, times the number of hours it takes on average to complete a repair. We recommend you compare your local shops with Jerry and contact those shops directly to get final pricing for your vehicle.

What parts do I need for replacing the oil pump O-ring? How much do those parts cost?

If your oil pump O-ring needs to be replaced, you’ll luckily only need to buy one replacement part—a new O-ring!
The O-ring's price may change depending on its brand and quality, but it's typically quite cheap. The typical price range for an oil pump O-ring is $5 to $30
It's important to remember that these prices are estimates and can change based on the make and model of your car, the brand of the parts, and where you buy them.
Some popular oil pump O-ring brands include Fel-Pro, Victor Reinz and ACDelco. You can find these at local auto parts stores such as AutoZone or Advance Auto Parts, or through online retailers such as RockAuto and Amazon.
Original equipment manufacturer (OEM) parts are the best option if you value durability and are willing to spend more for a new oil pump O-ring. OEM components are also manufactured by the same company that created the vehicle's original part, guaranteeing the highest quality and compatibility. 
That said, a reputable aftermarket brand that has favorable reviews can be a good option if you're looking to save some money.
You can buy oil pump O-ring parts through several sources. Visit your local AutoZone, Advance Auto Parts, or similar auto parts store for the easiest method. You can also shop online through sites like Amazon and eBay.
Another great option is specialty auto stores. These shops specialize in automotive repairs and parts so they may have a more extensive inventory and more expertise to help you find an oil pump O-ring suited to your car.

Where can I get my oil pump O-ring replaced?

Finding a trustworthy shop or mechanic to replace the O-ring in your oil pump can be challenging. Thankfully, Jerry's
GarageGuard™
offers access to price quotes from more than 2,500 pre-screened service providers across the country. 
All shops' accurate price quotes are based on their hourly labor rates, so you can easily compare the costs of diagnostics and other services between them. Reading former customer reviews might be helpful as well!
Below you'll find a few of our most reliable vetted auto repair shops. For instant price quotes, be sure to download the mobile app!
142 Reviews
Havoline Xpress Lube - #1324
address
11988 W. Jewell Avenue, Lakewood, CO
Oil Pump O-Ring Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$965
(Parts - $226, Labor - $739)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$137
123 Reviews
Wrench Inc. - PHL

Oil Pump O-Ring Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$1,082
(Parts - $226, Labor - $856)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$150
118 Reviews
Lake Anne Service Center
address
11410 North Shore Dr, Great Falls, VA
Oil Pump O-Ring Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$1,082
(Parts - $226, Labor - $856)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$135
170 Reviews
North American Motors
address
20531 Mission Blvd, Oakland, CA
Oil Pump O-Ring Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$1,014
(Parts - $226, Labor - $788)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$150
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How did we vet these shops?

Jerry experts researched 2500+ real repair shops across the US. We talked to real shop customers, and analyzed both real shop pricing data and thousands of real customer reviews from each shop to verify them individually. We do not partner with the shops listed above, and our analysis is always unbiased.

How will a mechanic replace my oil pump O-ring?

These are the steps that a mechanic will typically follow to replace the O-ring on the oil pump:
  1. Drain engine oil: The mechanic will drain the engine oil before beginning repairs to avoid messes and keep their workspace clear.
  2. Access the oil pump: They may have to remove other parts to get to the oil pump, depending on the vehicle's layout. This could mean taking out the oil pan or other parts of the engine as needed.
  3. Remove the old O-ring: Once the oil pump can be accessed, the mechanic will carefully remove the old O-ring. 
  4. Install the new O-ring: The mechanic will thoroughly clean the surfaces of the old O-ring to remove any oil, debris, or residue. They will then install the new oil pump O-ring.
  5. Reassemble: After installing the new O-ring, the mechanic will reinstall the oil pump and any other parts that were taken apart. Each part will be aligned precisely and torqued per the manufacturer's guidelines.
  6. Refill engine oil: The mechanic will refill the engine with the correct amount and type of oil after the oil pump has been reassembled.

What happens if I don’t replace my oil pump O-ring?

Failure to replace a damaged or worn oil pump O-ring can result in several problems and expensive repairs to the engine. If you don't regularly replace the oil pump's O-ring, the following issues may occur:

What is the oil pump O-ring?

Oil is pumped up from the oil pan and circulated through the engine to keep moving parts lubricated. The oil pump must use a gasket or O-ring to prevent oil from leaking past the mounting location during this process.
A vehicle's make, model, and year can all affect which O-ring is used in the oil pump and other engine parts. These O-rings can withstand the high temperatures, high pressures, and chemical environments found in an engine because they are typically made of rubber or another flexible material.

When should I replace the oil pump O-ring on my car?

If your vehicle is experiencing any of the following issues, you may have a bad oil pump O-ring in need of replacing:
  1. Low oil pressure: Oil leaks caused by a deteriorating O-ring can reduce oil pressure. It could be an indication of O-ring problems if the oil pressure warning light comes on or if the oil pressure gauge reads lower than usual.
  2. Oil leaks: Leaking oil from the oil pump or the engine block is a common warning sign. Puddles or drips of oil under a parked car indicate an oil leak.
  3. Increased oil consumption: As oil leaks from the engine, a failing O-ring can cause excessive oil consumption. If you need to add oil often between
    oil changes
    or notice your oil levels remain low, it might be due to an O-ring problem.
  4. Strange engine noises: Knocking, ticking, or grinding noises can indicate an oil leak, which can cause low oil pressure and thus unusual engine noises. Increased friction between engine parts is to blame for these noises.
  5. Engine performance issues: Engine performance may suffer as a result of insufficient lubrication of engine components, including decreased power and responsiveness.
  6. Oil contamination: Inspect your engine oil regularly for signs of contamination, like coolant mixing with the oil. This can happen when an O-ring fails and causes oil and coolant to combine, resulting in a milky appearance.
It's important to remember that these warning signs may look different depending on the year, make, and model of your car.
If you observe any of these symptoms, have a professional mechanic examine your vehicle as soon as possible. They will be able to determine if the oil pump O-ring needs to be replaced or if other problems need addressing. 
To avoid more serious engine problems, it is important to replace a worn or damaged O-ring as soon as possible.

How often should the oil pump O-ring be replaced?

Most of the time, there is no set time to replace the oil pump O-ring and it is expected to last a long time. It is typically changed during
routine maintenance
or a repair that requires getting to the oil pump. When repairing an oil leak, replacing the oil pump, or overhauling an engine, for example, it's a good idea to also replace the O-ring.
If you inspect and service your engine and lubrication system regularly, you can catch any problems before they become disastrous.

Can I replace my oil pump O-ring myself?

Changing the O-ring in an oil pump can be difficult if you have no background in auto repair. It requires a thorough understanding of your car's engine system as well as the proper disassembly and reassembly procedures. 

FAQs

A leaking oil pump is a major problem for a car's engine. Leaks in the oil pump—which is responsible for recirculating engine oil to lubricate critical components—can result in inadequate oil pressure and, in extreme cases, complete engine failure. Without maintenance, the engine could overheat, wear out prematurely, and cause excessive repair costs if it were to break down entirely.
Vaseline (petroleum jelly) is not a recommended lubricant for O-rings. Vaseline may work as a temporary lubricant but it is petroleum-based, so it can eventually break down rubber O-rings and cause them to leak or fail. Rubber or other elastomeric materials are commonly used in O-rings, and exposure to petroleum-based compounds may cause the rubber to swell, harden, or lose its sealing qualities.
To make sure O-rings seal properly and don't get damaged, it's best to use lubricants that are made for rubber seals, like silicone-based lubricants or even specialized O-ring lubricants.
It is not recommended to drive with a leaking oil pump because of the risk to the engine. Staying on the road with a leaking oil pump can cause the problem to worsen, leading to more expensive repairs or even total engine failure.

Meet Our Experts

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John Davis
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Car Expert
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Certified mechanic with 10+ years of experience
John Davis is an expert automotive writer and former automotive mechanic. John's work spans multiple categories, and he relishes the opportunity to research a new subject and expand his area of expertise and industry knowledge. To date, John has written more than 200 articles covering car maintenance and care, car advice, how-to guides, and more.
Prior to joining Jerry’s editorial team, John worked as a mechanic and freelance writer, creating content for clients including HotCars and SetPower.
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Jessica Barrett
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Car Expert
Jessica Barrett is a senior insurance writer and editor with 10 years of experience in the automotive and travel industries. A specialist in car insurance, car loans, and car ownership, Jessica’s mission is to create comprehensive content that car owners can use to manage their costs and improve their lives. As a managing editor for a team of writers and insurance specialists, Jessica has edited over 2,000 articles for Jerry on topics ranging from local insurance shopping tips to refinancing car loans with bad credit.
Before joining Jerry as a senior content editor in 2021, Jessica created visual content for clients such as Expedia, Vivid Seats, Budget Direct Car Insurance, Angie’s List, and HomeAdvisor. Her content was published in Business Insider, Forbes, Apartment Therapy, and the BBC.
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Kathleen Flear
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Car Expert
Kathleen Flear is an expert insurance writer and editor who heads up Jerry’s editorial team as director of content. Kathleen empowers drivers to make smart car ownership decisions through  best-in-class articles on insurance, loans, and maintenance. Prior to joining Jerry in 2021, Kathleen served as managing editor for a team of SEO content marketing professionals at Article-Writing.co and worked as a freelance writer and editor for a range of digital publications, including Chicago Literati magazine and Golden Words. She earned a bachelor’s degree in English language and literature from Queen’s University, and a master’s degree in creative writing and fiction from Sierra Nevada University.
*The price information provided on our car repair webpages is intended for general informational purposes only. Actual prices for car repair services may vary based on various factors, including but not limited to the make and model of your vehicle, the extent of repair required, and the prevailing market conditions. All prices for real repair shops are estimations based on our research only. Therefore, the prices listed on our webpages should not be considered as final quotes or binding offers.