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Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor Replacement Cost Estimate

Worried you might overpay for your manifold absolute pressure sensor replacement? Use Jerry’s GarageGuard to get fair cost estimates for your manifold absolute pressure sensor replacement.
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John Davis
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Reviewed by Kathleen Flear, Director of Content
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Edited by Jessica Barrett, Senior Car & Insurance Editor

How much does it cost to replace a MAP sensor?

You can expect an average total replacement cost of $140-$175 for a MAP sensor replacement, with $100-$130 for parts and $30-$50 for mechanic labor. The exact price will depend on your vehicle and whether any of the parts are under warranty.
How long does it take to replace a MAP sensor? In general, it takes around 1-2 hours for a certified mechanic to complete the job. Your mechanic will perform a preliminary inspection to determine if a replacement is necessary, then follow through with the full replacement. 
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How did we estimate these prices?

Jerry's experts researched and collected data from 2500+ real repair shops in all 50 states in the US, including everything from the total cost of repair services to the hourly labor cost for mechanic labor in each shop. We combined that data with our expert database of hundreds of real repair jobs, thousands of real cars, millions of real car part prices in order to best estimate the cost of each repair service. Our labor cost estimate is calculated by taking the average hourly labor rate for a certified mechanic in the US, times the number of hours it takes on average to complete a repair. We recommend you compare your local shops with Jerry and contact those shops directly to get final pricing for your vehicle.

What parts do I need for my MAP sensor replacement and how much do those parts cost?

You can check your owner’s manual or ask your mechanic for precise parts, but here’s the main thing you need:
  1. MAP sensor: This is the main component that needs to be replaced. In modern engines, a MAP sensor is an engine sensor that measures the air pressure within a vehicle's engine intake manifold. On average, a new MAP sensor can range from $20 to $150.
You can buy manifold absolute pressure (MAP) sensor parts for your common car from auto parts stores like AutoZone, Advance Auto Parts, and O'Reilly Auto Parts, as well as online retailers such as Amazon and eBay. Three of our recommended brands for MAP sensor parts are Standard Motor Products, ACDelco, and Bosch. However, the right parts and brands for your replacement will vary depending on your vehicle’s year, make, and model.
When choosing between OEM or aftermarket options for a new MAP sensor, there are pros and cons to both options. While OEM units tend to be costlier, they typically last longer and offer more reliability compared to their cheaper aftermarket parts.
You can find MAP sensors at body shops and auto parts shops like AutoZone, Advance Auto Parts, and O'Reilly Auto Parts, as well as on Amazon. However, before you purchase any parts, check your owner’s manual to make sure the part you’re purchasing is compatible with your vehicle.

Where can I get my MAP sensor replaced?

Finding a trustworthy auto shop can be challenging, especially for first-time car repairs. Jerry's
GarageGuard™
eases the process by comparing prices from over 2,500 reputable auto repair shops nationwide.
Jerry's GarageGuard™ utilizes actual hourly labor rates to provide fair price estimates, including potential extras like diagnostic fees. Real customer reviews help you make confident decisions when selecting the best shop.
Explore our vetted shops listed below and download the app to compare automotive repair quotes in your local area.
164 Reviews
D1 Auto Repair
address
1840 North, Miami, FL
Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor Map Sensor Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$193
(Parts - $133, Labor - $60)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$50
111 Reviews
Campus Auto Repair
address
2960 E Grand Blvd, Detroit, MI
Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor Map Sensor Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$223
(Parts - $133, Labor - $90)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$50
125 Reviews
Pep Boys Auto Parts & Service - Lakewood #1666
address
5453 E Del Amo Blvd, Long Beach, CA
Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor Map Sensor Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$270
(Parts - $133, Labor - $137)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$100
120 Reviews
Stan's Garage
address
24301 W Warren St, Dearborn Heights, MI
Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor Map Sensor Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$251
(Parts - $133, Labor - $118)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$125
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How did we vet these shops?

Jerry experts researched 2500+ real repair shops across the US. We talked to real shop customers, and analyzed both real shop pricing data and thousands of real customer reviews from each shop to verify them individually. We do not partner with the shops listed above, and our analysis is always unbiased.

How will a mechanic replace my MAP sensor?

It’s impossible to identify a MAP sensor malfunction with the naked eye, so a skilled mechanic will need to pinpoint the problem. Here are the steps they will take:
  • Evaluate and remove the failing MAP sensor
  • Install a new MAP sensor
  • Test the car’s computer and reset any triggered codes
  • Close the hood and road test the car to ensure any issues are resolved

What happens if I don’t replace a bad MAP sensor?

Don’t delay getting your MAP sensor evaluated and replaced.
If you let it go for too long, your engine will run with either too much fuel or too much air—creating an air-fuel mixture that’s either too “rich” or too “lean”. That can do a number on your engine and lead to long-term problems, including: 
  • Reduced engine performance: A faulty MAP sensor can cause reduced engine power, sluggish acceleration, and overall poor performance
  • Decreased fuel economy: An inaccurate MAP sensor can disrupt the engine's fuel management system, leading to inefficient combustion and increased fuel consumption, resulting in higher fuel costs
  • Emission problems: A bad MAP sensor can cause increased emissions, potentially leading to your vehicle failing emissions tests
  • Rough idling: The engine may experience rough idling (when it vibrates or shakes when at a standstill) due to incorrect air-to-fuel ratio caused by the failing MAP sensor
  • Engine misfires: Improper air-fuel mixture can lead to engine misfires, causing a lack of power and a rough running engine

What is a MAP sensor?

Since engines today operate with more complex processes than ever, the MAP sensor is an electronic feature that manages the amount and temperature of the air entering the intake manifold, relaying that information to the car’s computer. It then makes adjustments to optimize the engine’s performance while preventing it from overworking itself.

What are the symptoms of a bad MAP sensor?

There are the common symptoms to look for when evaluating the health of your MAP sensor:
  • The car makes rough or erratic motions when it’s idle (not moving)
  • The engine stalls when the car accelerates or decelerates
  • The check engine light turns on
  • Extra exhaust exits the engine, potentially resulting in a failed emissions test
If you’re noticing these signs, take your car to a mechanic for immediate inspection. Engine issues are serious, so it’s best to address problems as soon as possible.

How often do you need to replace a MAP sensor?

MAP sensors are meant to last the car’s lifetime. That being said, they usually start to show signs of wear after the 150k mile mark. 

Is replacing a MAP sensor yourself easy?

If you want to replace a MAP sensor yourself, you should be confident in your auto repair and DIY skills. While it’s not the most challenging procedure, for the average car owner it’s best to let a certified mechanic diagnose and fix the problem.

FAQs

Aside from your engine potentially sustaining some serious damage, in most states, you need to pass an annual emissions test to legally drive your car on the road—and if your MAP sensor is broken, that’s unlikely to happen.
If your check engine light is on or there’s excessive exhaust coming from the engine, your car won’t be cleared for use. Given this little electronic sensor’s major role in maintaining your car’s health and safety, it’s important to ensure it’s always working correctly.
Replacing a MAP sensor can be relatively simple, especially if it’s easily accessible on the intake manifold or air intake tube. However, the challenging part is diagnosing the issue accurately.
This service takes an average of one hour to complete.
While a MAP sensor provides a measurement of the air pressure within the intake manifold, a mass airflow (MAF) sensor, on the other hand, measures the amount of air aspirated by the engine.

Meet Our Experts

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John Davis
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Car Expert
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Certified mechanic with 10+ years of experience
John Davis is an expert automotive writer and former automotive mechanic. John's work spans multiple categories, and he relishes the opportunity to research a new subject and expand his area of expertise and industry knowledge. To date, John has written more than 200 articles covering car maintenance and care, car advice, how-to guides, and more.
Prior to joining Jerry’s editorial team, John worked as a mechanic and freelance writer, creating content for clients including HotCars and SetPower.
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Jessica Barrett
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Car Expert
Jessica Barrett is a senior insurance writer and editor with 10 years of experience in the automotive and travel industries. A specialist in car insurance, car loans, and car ownership, Jessica’s mission is to create comprehensive content that car owners can use to manage their costs and improve their lives. As a managing editor for a team of writers and insurance specialists, Jessica has edited over 2,000 articles for Jerry on topics ranging from local insurance shopping tips to refinancing car loans with bad credit.
Before joining Jerry as a senior content editor in 2021, Jessica created visual content for clients such as Expedia, Vivid Seats, Budget Direct Car Insurance, Angie’s List, and HomeAdvisor. Her content was published in Business Insider, Forbes, Apartment Therapy, and the BBC.
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Kathleen Flear
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Car Expert
Kathleen Flear is an expert insurance writer and editor who heads up Jerry’s editorial team as director of content. Kathleen empowers drivers to make smart car ownership decisions through  best-in-class articles on insurance, loans, and maintenance. Prior to joining Jerry in 2021, Kathleen served as managing editor for a team of SEO content marketing professionals at Article-Writing.co and worked as a freelance writer and editor for a range of digital publications, including Chicago Literati magazine and Golden Words. She earned a bachelor’s degree in English language and literature from Queen’s University, and a master’s degree in creative writing and fiction from Sierra Nevada University.
*The price information provided on our car repair webpages is intended for general informational purposes only. Actual prices for car repair services may vary based on various factors, including but not limited to the make and model of your vehicle, the extent of repair required, and the prevailing market conditions. All prices for real repair shops are estimations based on our research only. Therefore, the prices listed on our webpages should not be considered as final quotes or binding offers.