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Center Support Bearing Replacement Cost Estimate

Worried you might overpay for your Center Support Bearing replacement? Use Jerry’s GarageGuard to get fair cost estimate for your Center Support Bearing replacement.
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John Davis
Expert Automotive Writer
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Reviewed by Kathleen Flear, Director of Content
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Edited by Jessica Barrett, Senior Car & Insurance Editor

How much does it cost to replace a center support bearing?

Expect to pay a total cost of around $572 for a replacement center support bearing, with $100 for parts and $472for labor costs. Your exact repair cost depends on your vehicle.
How long does it take to replace a center support bearing?
A certified mechanic typically takes around 4.0 hours to finish the replacement. This includes a preliminary inspection to make a diagnosis and decide whether or not to replace the bearing.
Check out this overview of center support bearing replacement costs for different vehicles:
Center support bearing replacement cost for various vehicles
Estimate DateCustomerCarFair Cost EstimateParts CostLabor CostLabor Time
May 25, 2024
Plymouth Neon
$368
$86
$282
2.4 Hours
May 24, 2024
Lexus GX
$368
$86
$282
2.4 Hours
May 20, 2024
Chevrolet Lumina
$364
$86
$278
2.4 Hours
May 15, 2024
Mercury Sable
$347
$86
$261
2.4 Hours
May 15, 2024
Porsche Panamera
$375
$86
$288
2.4 Hours
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How did we estimate these prices?

Jerry's experts researched and collected data from 2500+ real repair shops in all 50 states in the US, including everything from the total cost of repair services to the hourly labor cost for mechanic labor in each shop. We combined that data with our expert database of hundreds of real repair jobs, thousands of real cars, millions of real car part prices in order to best estimate the cost of each repair service. Our labor cost estimate is calculated by taking the average hourly labor rate for a certified mechanic in the US, times the number of hours it takes on average to complete a repair. We recommend you compare your local shops with Jerry and contact those shops directly to get final pricing for your vehicle.

What parts do I need for my center support bearing replacement and how much do those parts cost?

Ask a mechanic or auto parts store specialist to advise you on the specific parts you’ll need. In general, here’s what you’ll need to pick up:
  1. New center support bearing: This small metal piece also comes with the entire housing—the outer housing, inner bearing, and inner plastic supports. Replacing the center support bearing costs anywhere from $86 to $105.
Keep in mind that you’ll also need specialized tools to do the replacement. For instance, you’ll need:
  • Brass hammer
  • Rubber or plastic-tipped hammer
  • Socket wrench set
  • Floor jack and jack stands
  • Lubricating grease
  • Combination wrench set
We recommend purchasing parts at local auto parts stores like AutoZone, Advance Auto Parts, and O'Reilly Auto Parts, as well as online retailers like Amazon and RockAuto. We also recommend reputable brands such as Timken, SKF, and Moog are recommended for center support bearings, ensuring reliable support and smooth operation for your vehicle's driveshaft. However, like price, recommended brands may also vary depending on your vehicle’s specific year, make, and model.
Pick up parts from your local auto parts store like AutoZone, Advance Auto Parts, and O'Reilly Auto Parts. If they don’t have your part in stock, they can special order it for you. You might also be able to find parts online at Amazon or RockAuto—just check that you’re getting part numbers that match your vehicle.
It’s a matter of personal preference. If you’re on a tight budget or have limited options for parts, an aftermarket bearing makes sense. If your vehicle is still under warranty though, you might be required to use OEM parts or risk voiding the coverage.

Where can I get my center support bearing replaced?

With the rundown on 2,500+ vetted repair shops nationwide, Jerry's
GarageGuard™
can make the search for a mechanic to replace your center support bearing a lot easier.
Jerry's GarageGuard™ compares fair price estimates from local shops using actual hourly rates. You’ll be able to budget for diagnostic fees and see reviews from previous customers to make sure you’ll be happy with your service.
Here’s a look at some of our vetted shops below—and you can download the app to compare car repair quotes in your area.
180 Reviews
Salazar Repair and Towing
address
1719 Grant St Unit #1, San Jose, CA
Center Support Bearing Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$359
(Parts - $96, Labor - $263)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$165
174 Reviews
RepairSmith - Greater Los Angeles

Center Support Bearing Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$384
(Parts - $96, Labor - $288)
118 Reviews
Admiral Auto Care
address
6709 Pearl Rd, Cleveland, OH
Center Support Bearing Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$396
(Parts - $96, Labor - $300)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$90
177 Reviews
54th Street Auto Center
address
415 W 54th St, New York, NY
Center Support Bearing Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$499
(Parts - $96, Labor - $403)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$191
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How did we vet these shops?

Jerry experts researched 2500+ real repair shops across the US. We talked to real shop customers, and analyzed both real shop pricing data and thousands of real customer reviews from each shop to verify them individually. We do not partner with the shops listed above, and our analysis is always unbiased.

How will a mechanic replace my center support bearing?

Once you’ve found a mechanic, repair shop, or dealership service center that specializes in transmissions, ask them to inspect your vehicle’s center support bearing. If they find that it’s failing or broken, here are the steps they’ll take to replace it:
  1. Prepare: The mechanic uses a floor jack and jack stands to raise your vehicle to access the undercarriage. They’ll also get out the necessary tools and equipment while the engine cools. 
  2. Remove the transmission driveshaft: They’ll remove the bolts that secure the front driveshaft to the center support bearing before removing the rear driveshaft bolts. 
  3. Remove the center support bearing: Next, the mechanic will remove the bolts in order to take out the old bearing housing. They’ll clean the ends of the driveshaft with solvent.
  4. Install the new center support bearing: The mechanic applies lubrication to the shaft, so the bearing housing slides on easily.
  5. Re-install the transmission driveshaft to the vehicle: They’ll re-assemble the driveshaft in reverse order, re-attaching the bolts as they go.
  6. Lower the vehicle and test drive it for safety: Once your vehicle passes this final inspection, you’re good to go!

Is it bad to drive with a bad center support bearing?

Get your vehicle to an auto repair shop at the first sign of a failing center support bearing. If you continue to drive, the vibration, noise, and banging will only get worse. Plus, a bad center support bearing prevents the driveshaft from flexing and spinning freely, which can damage your transmission, differential parts, or the driveshaft
The longer you wait to diagnose and repair a bad center support bearing, the higher your repair costs could be!

What is a center support bearing?

Center support bearings are usually found on heavy-duty vehicles, like trucks, that have long drive shafts. The shafts are split into two sections, with the center support bearing holding them together and supporting the weight on the rear half.
The driveshaft transfers power from the transmission to the differential in order to turn the rear wheels. The center support bearing is also called the drive shaft center support bearing or carrier bearing.
If the center support bearing wears out or breaks, the driveshaft can’t spin. This can cause problems with the transmission, drive shaft, or differential.

How do I know if my center support bearing is bad?

Your mechanic should check the center support bearings every time you bring your vehicle in for regular maintenance. If you’re between maintenance appointments, watch for these signs that the center support bearing is failing or damaged:
  • Squeaking or grinding sounds: The sounds will get worse and change pitch over time. Don’t ignore them! Get your center support bearing inspected.
  • Shuddering or shaking when you accelerate: There is vibration-damping material between the bearing and the housing. If it wears out, you’ll notice vibration throughout the entire vehicle. Get your vehicle inspected if your vehicle is shuddering or underperforming.

How often should a center support bearing be replaced?

Center support bearings can last a long time—some drivers never have to replace them. However, if you regularly drive in rough conditions or take your vehicle off-road, the bearing can wear out over the years. Generally, you only need to replace the bearing if it starts to fail.

Can I replace my center support bearing?

Most DIY mechanics find it hard to replace their own center support bearing since it’s difficult to remove and assemble the driveshaft. Plus, you’ll need a bunch of specialized tools and equipment. It’s probably a good idea to leave this one to the professionals.

FAQs

Like many automotive parts that get constant use, the center support bearing can wear out over time. The metal bearing itself will wear out, as will the vibration-dampening material that sits between the bearing and the housing.
If the bearing is starting to fail, you could hear squealing or howling. It will change pitch the longer you drive without repairing the bearing.

Meet Our Experts

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John Davis
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Car Expert
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Certified mechanic with 10+ years of experience
John Davis is an expert automotive writer and former automotive mechanic. John's work spans multiple categories, and he relishes the opportunity to research a new subject and expand his area of expertise and industry knowledge. To date, John has written more than 200 articles covering car maintenance and care, car advice, how-to guides, and more.
Prior to joining Jerry’s editorial team, John worked as a mechanic and freelance writer, creating content for clients including HotCars and SetPower.
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Jessica Barrett
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Car Expert
Jessica Barrett is a senior insurance writer and editor with 10 years of experience in the automotive and travel industries. A specialist in car insurance, car loans, and car ownership, Jessica’s mission is to create comprehensive content that car owners can use to manage their costs and improve their lives. As a managing editor for a team of writers and insurance specialists, Jessica has edited over 2,000 articles for Jerry on topics ranging from local insurance shopping tips to refinancing car loans with bad credit.
Before joining Jerry as a senior content editor in 2021, Jessica created visual content for clients such as Expedia, Vivid Seats, Budget Direct Car Insurance, Angie’s List, and HomeAdvisor. Her content was published in Business Insider, Forbes, Apartment Therapy, and the BBC.
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Kathleen Flear
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Car Expert
Kathleen Flear is an expert insurance writer and editor who heads up Jerry’s editorial team as director of content. Kathleen empowers drivers to make smart car ownership decisions through  best-in-class articles on insurance, loans, and maintenance. Prior to joining Jerry in 2021, Kathleen served as managing editor for a team of SEO content marketing professionals at Article-Writing.co and worked as a freelance writer and editor for a range of digital publications, including Chicago Literati magazine and Golden Words. She earned a bachelor’s degree in English language and literature from Queen’s University, and a master’s degree in creative writing and fiction from Sierra Nevada University.
*The price information provided on our car repair webpages is intended for general informational purposes only. Actual prices for car repair services may vary based on various factors, including but not limited to the make and model of your vehicle, the extent of repair required, and the prevailing market conditions. All prices for real repair shops are estimations based on our research only. Therefore, the prices listed on our webpages should not be considered as final quotes or binding offers.