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Alternator Bracket Replacement Cost Estimate

Worried you might overpay for your alternator bracket replacement? Use Jerry’s GarageGuard to get fair cost estimate for your alternator bracket replacement.
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John Davis
Expert Automotive Writer
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Reviewed by Kathleen Flear, Director of Content
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Edited by Jessica Barrett, Senior Car & Insurance Editor

How much does it cost to replace an alternator bracket?

For an alternator bracket replacement, you can expect to pay between $350-$1200. These prices are subject to change depending on the make and model of your current vehicle.
How long does it take to replace an alternator bracket? To replace an alternator bracket, it will take a licensed mechanic approximately 15 minutes. Prior to beginning any repairs, your mechanic will complete a thorough inspection of your vehicle’s alternator belt to ensure no damage has occurred.
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How did we estimate these prices?

Jerry's experts researched and collected data from 2500+ real repair shops in all 50 states in the US, including everything from the total cost of repair services to the hourly labor cost for mechanic labor in each shop. We combined that data with our expert database of hundreds of real repair jobs, thousands of real cars, millions of real car part prices in order to best estimate the cost of each repair service. Our labor cost estimate is calculated by taking the average hourly labor rate for a certified mechanic in the US, times the number of hours it takes on average to complete a repair. We recommend you compare your local shops with Jerry and contact those shops directly to get final pricing for your vehicle.

What parts do I need for my alternator bracket replacement and how much do those parts cost?

To successfully complete an alternator bracket replacement, you will need the following components:
  • Alternator bracket: Alternator brackets help to support your car’s alternator, and despite being a small part, left untreated, can cause lasting damage to your vehicle. Typically, the fee for a new alternator bracket is $20-$90.
You can buy alternator bracket parts for your car from auto parts stores like AutoZone, NAPA Auto Parts, and Advance Auto Parts, as well as online retailers such as Amazon and eBay. Three brands we recommend for alternator bracket parts are Dorman, Spectre Performance, and ACDelco. However, the right parts for your vehicle may vary depending on its year, make, and model.
When it comes to an alternator bracket replacement piece, either aftermarket or OEM parts are recommended. Depending on your vehicle, aftermarket options are typically cheaper in cost, allowing you more flexibility with your budget.
Alternator bracket replacement parts can be bought in-store at various auto body shops like AutoZone, NAPA Auto Parts, and Advance Auto Parts, or repair stores, or commercial retail stores like Walmart. Kits can also be bought online through Amazon. Before purchase, make sure to confirm the specific alternator bracket required for your vehicle with your owner’s manual.

Where can I get my alternator bracket replaced?

Finding the ideal mechanic can be difficult, especially when you’re on a budget. Luckily, Jerry's GarageGuard™ takes all the guess-work and financial stress out of car repairs. 
By comparing fair price repair estimates* across 2,500 verified shops in the US, Jerry's GarageGuard™ can help you fine-tune your budget and account for things like diagnostic fees (if not included in the service cost). Additionally, you’ll receive real reviews to aid in your search for the best repair services.
Review some of our vetted shops below, and download the app now to compare car repair quotes in your area.
152 Reviews
Velasquez Auto Care - Morgan
address
5811 W Capitol Dr, Milwaukee, WI
Alternator Bracket Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$241
(Parts - $215, Labor - $26)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$35
174 Reviews
Yoo's Auto Service & Collision
address
189 W Duncannon Ave, Philadelphia, PA
Alternator Bracket Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$236
(Parts - $215, Labor - $21)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$100
129 Reviews
Randolph Center Auto
address
328 N Main St, Boston, MA
Alternator Bracket Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$235
(Parts - $215, Labor - $20)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$0
153 Reviews
John Nolan Auto Service
address
15 E 4th St, Newport, Cincinnati, OH
Alternator Bracket Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$241
(Parts - $215, Labor - $26)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$100
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How did we vet these shops?

Jerry experts researched 2500+ real repair shops across the US. We talked to real shop customers, and analyzed both real shop pricing data and thousands of real customer reviews from each shop to verify them individually. We do not partner with the shops listed above, and our analysis is always unbiased.

How will a mechanic replace my alternator bracket?

To access the alternator bracket, several components of your vehicle, including the tensioner pulley, alternator belt, and alternator itself, need to be removed. During the alternator bracket replacement process, your mechanic will follow these steps: 
  1. Inspection: Before starting any work, your mechanic will check your alternator belt. If you leave your alternator bracket unattended for too long, it can cause extra strain on your alternator belt. This inspection ensures that there is no additional damage like fraying, tears, or loosening.  
  2. Remove car battery terminals: Whenever repairs are completed underneath your car’s hood, it’s imperative that your mechanic removes any car battery cables for safety. 
  3. Remove alternator adjustment pulley: Next, your mechanic will unhook and remove the alternator adjustment pulley, making it easier to access the alternator belt and bracket.
  4. Remove alternator belt: The removal of the alternator adjustment pulley loosens your alternator belt, allowing it to slip off with ease. If your alternator belt also needs replaced, your mechanic will discard your old belt. 
  5. Remove the alternator: The alternator bracket is the support system for your alternator. Therefore, in order to replace your alternator bracket, your mechanic will document every electrical connection with tape to remind them of where to insert each wire when reinstalling the alternator.
  6. Remove alternator bracket: After each step listed above, your mechanic will unscrew and remove your alternator bracket, then replace it with a new one. Once finished, they will then complete each step in reverse order, and add your new alternator belt, if required.
  7. Verify and test: Before starting the vehicle, your mechanic will verify the alternator belt tension and adjust it as necessary, then complete a routine test. 
Not all vehicles have a removable alternator bracket. For these vehicles, alternator bracket kits are available for purchase to support and fortify the engine while preventing potential damage.

What happens if I don’t replace my alternator bracket?

A neglected, unsecure alternator bracket can cause long-term damage to your vehicle’s alternator belt and alternator, resulting in a battery draining problem. The following symptoms might mean you have an unstable alternator bracket:
  • Rattling from the engine
  • Oil leak

What is an alternator bracket?

An alternator bracket is a metal support that holds and secures your car’s alternator to the engine. Without it, the alternator is unable to charge the car’s battery or send electrical power to the car’s accessories. 
A broken alternator bracket causes instability with the alternator and left unattended, can cost you more money in the long run. 

When should I replace the alternator bracket on my car?

Alternator bracket replacement doesn’t happen often—however, if you hear rattling sounds or experience random oil leaks, it might be time to have your alternator bracket examined. 

How often should an alternator bracket be replaced?

Alternator brackets are often only ever replaced if they come loose. An unstable alternator bracket can cause further damage to your alternator belt, resulting in too much heat development and friction. 
Keep in mind: Loose alternator brackets should never be adjusted. If you suspect your alternator bracket is unfastened, take your vehicle to the nearest auto body shop. 

Can I replace my alternator bracket myself?

Yes, you can replace an alternator bracket on your own if you have the know-how. However, this is a multi-step process that requires a mid to intermediate knowledge of auto body parts. As such, it’s best to have a professional mechanic manage your alternator bracket replacement. 

FAQs

Alternator brackets are made of steel or chrome. In order to support the alternator, alternator brackets and mounts need to be created using reinforced material strong enough to manage powerful vibrations and high internal temperatures while also being adverse to corrosion and wear.
There are 4 types of alternator mounts. These include the following: 
  • 1” Foot: Often described as a Motorola-style, the 1” foot alternator mount can be used on several engines ranging from Universal, Ford, Pathfinder, and more.
  • 2” Foot: The 2” foot alternator mount (known as the Delco-style) is typically found on cars such as Volvo, Perkins, GM, and Mercruiser.
  • 15” Dual Foot: This alternator mount is only found on Yanmar vehicles and a few select others, including Mercruiser, Hitachi, and Lehman.
  • 4” Dual Foot: Regarded as the J-180 mount, the 4” dual foot is compatible with larger engines like Detroit Diesel and John Deere. 
Your specific alternator mount and brackets will depend on your vehicle’s make and model.

Meet Our Experts

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John Davis
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Car Expert
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Certified mechanic with 10+ years of experience
John Davis is an expert automotive writer and former automotive mechanic. John's work spans multiple categories, and he relishes the opportunity to research a new subject and expand his area of expertise and industry knowledge. To date, John has written more than 200 articles covering car maintenance and care, car advice, how-to guides, and more.
Prior to joining Jerry’s editorial team, John worked as a mechanic and freelance writer, creating content for clients including HotCars and SetPower.
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Jessica Barrett
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Car Expert
Jessica Barrett is a senior insurance writer and editor with 10 years of experience in the automotive and travel industries. A specialist in car insurance, car loans, and car ownership, Jessica’s mission is to create comprehensive content that car owners can use to manage their costs and improve their lives. As a managing editor for a team of writers and insurance specialists, Jessica has edited over 2,000 articles for Jerry on topics ranging from local insurance shopping tips to refinancing car loans with bad credit.
Before joining Jerry as a senior content editor in 2021, Jessica created visual content for clients such as Expedia, Vivid Seats, Budget Direct Car Insurance, Angie’s List, and HomeAdvisor. Her content was published in Business Insider, Forbes, Apartment Therapy, and the BBC.
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Kathleen Flear
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Car Expert
Kathleen Flear is an expert insurance writer and editor who heads up Jerry’s editorial team as director of content. Kathleen empowers drivers to make smart car ownership decisions through  best-in-class articles on insurance, loans, and maintenance. Prior to joining Jerry in 2021, Kathleen served as managing editor for a team of SEO content marketing professionals at Article-Writing.co and worked as a freelance writer and editor for a range of digital publications, including Chicago Literati magazine and Golden Words. She earned a bachelor’s degree in English language and literature from Queen’s University, and a master’s degree in creative writing and fiction from Sierra Nevada University.
*The price information provided on our car repair webpages is intended for general informational purposes only. Actual prices for car repair services may vary based on various factors, including but not limited to the make and model of your vehicle, the extent of repair required, and the prevailing market conditions. All prices for real repair shops are estimations based on our research only. Therefore, the prices listed on our webpages should not be considered as final quotes or binding offers.