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Radiator Hose Replacement Cost Estimate

Worried you might overpay for your radiator hose replacement? Use Jerry’s GarageGuard to get a fair cost estimate for your radiator hose replacement.
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John Davis
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Reviewed by Kathleen Flear, Director of Content
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Edited by Jessica Barrett, Senior Car & Insurance Editor

How much does a radiator hose replacement cost?

The average total cost for a radiator hose replacement is $344, including $131 for parts and $212 for labor. The exact price will depend on your vehicle’s year and model.
The total parts cost includes a new radiator hose but may extend to a replacement radiator fan motor, coolant reservoir, or coolant level sensor as well. As for the labor costs, it takes around 1.8 hours hours for a certified mechanic to inspect your vehicle, diagnose the problem, and complete a radiator hose replacement.
Here’s how much you’ll pay to replace a radiator hose in some popular vehicle models:
Estimate DateCustomerCarFair Cost EstimateParts CostLabor CostLabor Time
May 20, 2024
Jeep Cherokee
$222
$86
$137
1.4 Hours
May 17, 2024
Hummer H2
$273
$95
$179
1.4 Hours
May 15, 2024
Mazda CX-5
$271
$86
$186
1.4 Hours
May 12, 2024
GMC Sierra 1500
$275
$86
$189
1.4 Hours
May 11, 2024
Chevrolet Spark
$268
$95
$174
1.4 Hours
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How did we estimate these prices?

Jerry's experts researched and collected data from 2500+ real repair shops in all 50 states in the US, including everything from the total cost of repair services to the hourly labor cost for mechanic labor in each shop. We combined that data with our expert database of hundreds of real repair jobs, thousands of real cars, millions of real car part prices in order to best estimate the cost of each repair service. Our labor cost estimate is calculated by taking the average hourly labor rate for a certified mechanic in the US, times the number of hours it takes on average to complete a repair. We recommend you compare your local shops with Jerry and contact those shops directly to get final pricing for your vehicle.

What parts do I need for a radiator hose replacement?

Radiator hoses, radiators, cooling fans, and a coolant reservoir make up the engine cooling system of your car. As the coolant flows from the reservoir to the engine, it absorbs excess heat and conveys it to the radiator through the radiator hoses. Coolant is redirected back to the engine by cooling fans, which disperse that heat.
Without a cooling system, your vehicle engine would swiftly overheat and explode. Putting it back in order might require a replacement:
  1. Radiator hose ($1-$750): There are two types of radiator hose: an upper and a lower. They’re not interchangeable, but they’re both made of rubber that expands and contracts with the heat of the coolant fluid passing through them. Radiator hoses generally go bad from the inside out, making it difficult to spot any damage. 
  2. Radiator ($80-$4,300): The radiator radiates the heat from the coolant flowing through it into the air. Radiators can crack, corrode, or simply wear out after years of dealing with high temperatures and pressure.
  3. Cooling/radiator fan motor
    ($5-$280): A lot of hot air accumulates around your car’s radiator; it’s the cooling fan’s job to blow it away. Like other electronics, cooling fan motors eventually blow out and need to be replaced.
  4. Coolant reservoir
    ($5-$855): The coolant reservoir is a plastic tank that holds the bulk of your vehicle’s coolant supply. Common problems include loose connections to the radiator hoses or cracks and leaks.
  5. Coolant
    ($10-$25): Coolant is a diluted mix of antifreeze and water, which is why you might see the two terms used interchangeably. Coolant may have additives added to it to clean and prolong the life of radiator hoses and the other parts it flows through. Fresh coolant is clear and comes in a range of bright colors, but the dirty stuff is a uniform shade of brown.
Keep in mind You might require a new coolant hose, radiator, or coolant tank to restore your engine’s cooling system.
You can purchase the parts needed to replace your radiator hose from auto parts stores like AutoZone or O’Reilly Auto Parts or from online retailers like eBay and Amazon. 
Curious what brands to buy? Gates, Dayco and ACDelco are some popular radiator hose brands. If you’re looking for a new radiator, Denso, Spectra Premium and CSF Radiators are reputable brands. Dorman, TYC and Four Seasons are popular radiator fan motor brands. URO Parts, Behr and Dorman are reliable coolant reservoir brands, and Prestone, ZEREX and Peak are popular coolant brands. Always consult your vehicle's manual or a professional mechanic to ensure you're using the right coolant for your specific vehicle. 
Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) parts cost much more than aftermarket parts, but they often include better warranties. For example, a new genuine Toyota radiator hose includes a 24-month/25,000-mile warranty if it’s installed by a certified Toyota mechanic. The average cost of parts is even higher for luxury makes like Audi or BMW. That being said, some aftermarket performance parts manufacturers offer just as much, if not more, quality as OEM parts.
You can buy replacement parts at automotive body shops, parts shops, dealerships, or online stores like Autozone or Amazon. If you prefer OEM parts, you can also try your vehicle manufacturer’s official website. Chevrolet, Nissan, Honda, and just about every other car maker sells OEM parts online. Check your owner’s manual for any crucial specifications so you don’t buy the wrong part.

Where can I get my radiator hose replaced?

An affordable, trustworthy mechanic makes a world of difference when it comes to your car’s life expectancy. The more maintenance you can do, the fewer breakdowns you’ll have, and the higher your car’s resale price will be. 
Jerry's GarageGuard™
helps customers find their go-to local mechanic by offering a simple way to find and compare repair costs in their area. GarageGuard’s fair price estimates* include diagnostics fees and real hourly labor rates so you can budget smart for repairs.
Say goodbye to car repair confusion! Download the app today to browse real user reviews of over 2,500 vetted auto repair shops across the US, including businesses like the ones below. 
162 Reviews
Ledoux's Auto Service
address
3924 Commercial St SE, Salem, OR
Radiator Hose Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$273
(Parts - $84, Labor - $189)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$75
170 Reviews
Jaramillos Transmission
address
2323 Quarry St, Dallas, TX
Radiator Hose Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$203
(Parts - $84, Labor - $119)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$60
115 Reviews
University Tire & Auto Service
address
2908 Vermont Ave, Los Angeles, CA
Radiator Hose Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$294
(Parts - $84, Labor - $210)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$180
169 Reviews
Choice Auto Repair
address
500 Nowell Rd, Raleigh, NC
Radiator Hose Replacement Cost
Fair Cost Estimate for This Shop
$294
(Parts - $84, Labor - $210)
Shop Diagnostic Fee
(Included in service charges)
$136
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How did we vet these shops?

Jerry experts researched 2500+ real repair shops across the US. We talked to real shop customers, and analyzed both real shop pricing data and thousands of real customer reviews from each shop to verify them individually. We do not partner with the shops listed above, and our analysis is always unbiased.

What happens during a radiator hose replacement?

A radiator hose replacement is a simple service requiring basic equipment and the right repair manual. Leave your car at a garage and the mechanic will:
  1. Allow the vehicle engine to cool.
  2. Drain the engine coolant tank into a collection pan by unscrewing the radiator cap.
  3. Inspect the engine cooling system and the condition of the hoses, coolant tank, and radiator.
  4. Remove the clamps holding the damaged upper or lower radiator hose in place at either end.
  5. Install the new lower or upper radiator hose(s). 
  6. Refill and bleed the coolant tank and lines of air. 
  7. Test the car to make sure the engine isn’t in danger of overheating.

Can I drive my car with a bad radiator hose?

Driving with a bad radiator hose can be dangerous. If you’ve got a leak, a blockage, or a collapsed radiator hose, the lack of coolant flow can cause your engine to overheat. Let’s not forget a car on the move contains hundreds of literal explosions under the hood—let the pressure and heat build up for long enough and you could severely damage your engine or worse.

What is a radiator hose replacement?

A radiator hose replacement is a routine service to your vehicle engine’s cooling system. It involves inspecting and replacing the lines that convey coolant between different components under the hood. Replacing your radiator hoses (and flushing your coolant lines) proactively can help prevent engine damage and prolong the life of your vehicle.

What are the signs of a bad radiator hose?

A bad radiator hose (whether it’s leaky, blocked, or collapsed) will produce a multitude of problems relating to the engine temperature and performance. Here are some warning signs to watch for: 
  1. Coolant leaks: If you see any bright, sweet-smelling red, yellow, or blue (or green, or orange, etc.) puddles of fluid below your car, there’s a coolant leak somewhere.
  2. Low coolant light: If there’s a leak and your car detects low coolant levels in the tank, it’ll put a warning light on the dash.
  3. Engine overheating: If your engine’s thermostat climbs too high, it’s serious. Your vehicle will post a warning light on the dash, you might smell burning, and you could hear thumping or knocking noises. You might even see steam escaping from under the hood.
  4. Malfunctioning heater: The heater repurposes the heat of hot coolant to make the cabin warm and toasty. If you can’t feel warm air coming from the vents, the culprit could be a blown radiator hose.
  5. Bulging or collapsed radiator hoses: Block a radiator hose and the pressure will cause it to swell and distort. Nick it and the resulting vacuum will cause it to shrink and fall. Either one is a sign to take your car to the mechanic ASAP.
Key Takeaway A coolant leak, an overheating engine, and weirdly-shaped hoses are all symptoms of a failing radiator hose.

What’s the average lifespan of a radiator hose?

Radiator hoses generally have a lifespan of four to five years. As always, differences in manufacturing quality, frequency of use, and climate can prolong or shorten these estimates. Look for engine coolant additives (also known as surfactants) that reduce corrosion and friction if you want your coolant hoses to last longer.

Are radiator hoses easy to replace?

A radiator hose replacement is a fairly simple DIY job requiring basic equipment and the right repair manual. You’ll need a screwdriver, a utility knife, a drain pan, a coolant funnel, and wheel chocks. Don’t forget a replacement hose, coolant fluid, and personal protective gear! Depending on the age and condition of your vehicle, the most challenging part of the job might be dealing with the clamps on the old radiator hose.

FAQs

It’s absolutely worth the money to replace a failed radiator hose. Labor and replacement radiator hose costs are low, but engine repair costs are incredibly high. Without proper coolant circulation, your engine could overheat and sustain severe damage.
Age, wear, extreme temperatures, and contamination can all cause radiator hoses to fail. The biggest danger to a radiator hose is the hot coolant circulating through it. Given enough time, they’ll eventually wear thin and fail. Neglecting to refresh and flush your coolant can quicken the problem.
ECD stands for “ElectroChemical Degradation”. As coolant flows through and around your car’s engine, it can pick up an electrical charge, which may cause microscopic tears and cracks to radiator hoses, O-rings, and gaskets. Save your hoses by shopping for a coolant with additives that reduce ECD.

Meet Our Experts

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John Davis
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Car Expert
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Certified mechanic with 10+ years of experience
John Davis is an expert automotive writer and former automotive mechanic. John's work spans multiple categories, and he relishes the opportunity to research a new subject and expand his area of expertise and industry knowledge. To date, John has written more than 200 articles covering car maintenance and care, car advice, how-to guides, and more.
Prior to joining Jerry’s editorial team, John worked as a mechanic and freelance writer, creating content for clients including HotCars and SetPower.
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Jessica Barrett
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Car Expert
Jessica Barrett is a senior insurance writer and editor with 10 years of experience in the automotive and travel industries. A specialist in car insurance, car loans, and car ownership, Jessica’s mission is to create comprehensive content that car owners can use to manage their costs and improve their lives. As a managing editor for a team of writers and insurance specialists, Jessica has edited over 2,000 articles for Jerry on topics ranging from local insurance shopping tips to refinancing car loans with bad credit.
Before joining Jerry as a senior content editor in 2021, Jessica created visual content for clients such as Expedia, Vivid Seats, Budget Direct Car Insurance, Angie’s List, and HomeAdvisor. Her content was published in Business Insider, Forbes, Apartment Therapy, and the BBC.
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Kathleen Flear
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Car Expert
Kathleen Flear is an expert insurance writer and editor who heads up Jerry’s editorial team as director of content. Kathleen empowers drivers to make smart car ownership decisions through  best-in-class articles on insurance, loans, and maintenance. Prior to joining Jerry in 2021, Kathleen served as managing editor for a team of SEO content marketing professionals at Article-Writing.co and worked as a freelance writer and editor for a range of digital publications, including Chicago Literati magazine and Golden Words. She earned a bachelor’s degree in English language and literature from Queen’s University, and a master’s degree in creative writing and fiction from Sierra Nevada University.
*The price information provided on our car repair webpages is intended for general informational purposes only. Actual prices for car repair services may vary based on various factors, including but not limited to the make and model of your vehicle, the extent of repair required, and the prevailing market conditions. All prices for real repair shops are estimations based on our research only. Therefore, the prices listed on our webpages should not be considered as final quotes or binding offers.