What Happened to OJ Simpson's White Bronco?

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For people of a certain age, a white Ford Bronco is loaded with association. Not just a tough SUV, it evokes spectacle and scandal. It’s a reminder of one of the most famous cultural events of the ‘90s—the OJ Simpson trial. 
View of taillight on white Ford Bronco driving on an LA road
A white Ford Bronco carries a lot of associations with it.

An unsettling origin story

Before 1994, OJ Simpson was known as a sports legend. A Heisman winner and a record-breaker in the NFL, he had spent most of his adult life impressing crowds with his astounding speed and strength. But by June of that year, his legacy would be forever tainted.
On that summer evening, the bodies of Simpson’s ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson and a man named Ron Goldman were discovered outside of Brown Simpson’s Los Angeles condominium. OJ was quickly identified as the primary suspect in these murders, and his arrest appeared to be imminent. But there was one problem—he was nowhere to be found.

The infamous white Ford Bronco

Suddenly a sensational murder had a sensational suspect: an American folk hero, now hiding from law enforcement. And he was hiding in a white Ford Bronco. 
Helicopters buzzed above the 5 freeway in Southern California, keeping tabs on the vehicle that contained the fugitive. Al Cowlings, the owner of the vehicle, drove while Simpson hid in the back. Police cars tailed the vehicle, and it became one of the most-watched car chases in history, with millions of people tuning in.
This bizarre scene culminated in the Bronco pulling up to Simpson’s home in Brentwood, California, where he surrendered to the police. What happened after that is also legendary; a wild trial that ended in acquittal, which divided the country.

What happened to the Bronco?

Oddly, both Simpson and Al Cowlings had white Broncos. The one used in that infamous car chase was the property of Cowlings. According to ESPN, this car enjoyed an extremely quiet life after this event and it remained parked underground in a nondescript condo lot in Los Angeles. Here it sat from 1995 to 2012, surrounded by other residents’ cars, for the most part totally anonymous.
A company called Startifacts made an offer of $75,000 to Al Cowlings for the Bronco. But before the vehicle changed hands, Cowlings and Simpson’s ex-agent Mike Gilbert discovered the unsavory way that the company planned to use the vehicle. 
Startifacts would lend the Bronco to another company, which would reenact the car chase (concluding at Nicole Brown Simpson’s grave) as a kind of tourist attraction. Gilbert and Cowlings instead came up with a deal where they would co-own it with a third person. Instead of being put on display, the car sat in a garage and enjoyed occasional drives and battery changes. 
Despite a few brief stints in Las Vegas and Connecticut, the car has remained essentially undisturbed, still in Gilbert’s possession. It had the ride of its life, and now it’s enjoying a peaceful retirement. 
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