South Carolina Driving Record

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In South Carolina, you can get a copy of your driving record online, in person, or by mail from the state DMV. A certified record will cost you $6. 
Your driving record is just one of many factors that can affect your car insurance rate. It can also impact employment opportunities and even your ability to drive. So, it’s in your best interest to keep your record clean.
Jerry, the car owner’s super app, is breaking down everything you need to know about your South Carolina driving record.

What is a driving record?

A driving record is a history of your time on the road from the time you first got your license. Typically, your driving record will include things like traffic violations, license suspensions or revocations, and points you’ve accrued over the years.

How do I access my driving record in South Carolina?

You can order both certified and non-certified copies of your individual South Carolina driving record through the South Carolina Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV). If you’re purchasing a certified driving record, you will also have the option to access a non-certified, unofficial PDF version when you complete your transaction. 
To order your record in person at the DMV you will need: 
  • A completed Request for Driver Information form (MV-70)
  • Payment of $6
To order your record by mail you will need: 
  • A completed Request for Driver Information form (MV-70)
  • A $6 check or money order payable to “SC Department of Motor Vehicles” 

Requesting a driving record for someone else

You may pull your certified driver record and other authorized individuals can view a non-certified copy online. Only the below individuals and agencies may access your driving record in South Carolina: 
  • Government agencies
  • Employers and businesses verifying information during background checks
  • Insurance agencies
  • Individuals with written consent from you
  • Research and statistics
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Where else can I find my driving record in South Carolina?

Other than the South Carolina DMV, you can find a copy of your driving record through your insurance agent or an online third party.

Car insurance agents

Car insurance companies may request your South Carolina driving record if they are investigating claims or adjusting policy rates. And if you ask your agent for a copy, they’ll likely be happy to provide it—though it won’t be official or certified.

Online third-party vendors

If you don’t need a certified copy of your driving record, you can obtain an unofficial copy through one of the DMV-approved partners. While using a third-party vendor will be quick, the report will not include any information that isn’t readily available in public records.

What is on my record?

Your driving record consists of details about you and your driving history. The basic record in South Carolina typically includes:
  • Your driving history
  • Past driving violations
  • Traffic accidents
  • Driver’s license suspensions
  • Driving record points

DMV points in South Carolina

South Carolina adds points to your driving record, which can lead to fines, suspensions, and higher insurance rates. If you accrue 12 or more points, your driver’s license will be suspended. 
Some common offenses where points are assessed include: 
  • Speeding up to 10mph over the posted limit (2 points)
  • Speeding over 10mph but less than 25 mph over the posted limit (3 points)
  • Speeding 25mph or faster (6 points)
  • Failure to yield right of way (4 points)
  • Making an illegal turn (4 points)
  • Reckless driving (6 points)
  • Leaving the scene of an accident resulting in property damage (6 points)
Points will decrease by half after one year if you do not incur any additional violations. You can also complete the National Safety Council defensive driving course to have points reduced or removed from your record once every 3 years. 
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How can my driving record affect me?

Your driving record impacts multiple aspects of your life.

Your insurance premium

South Carolina offers drivers the option of paying an uninsured driver’s fee of $550 in lieu of carrying an insurance policy. But let the buyer beware: if you are uninsured, there will be steep out-of-pocket costs if you get into an accident. 
If you do want insurance but have a poor driving record, expect to pay significantly more for your premium. Your driving record lets insurance companies know how much of a risk you are for them to insure, and higher-risk drivers will always pay more.

Your ability to drive

If you have a DUI charge on your record, it means immediate suspension of your driver’s license. The South Carolina DMV might assign points and automatically suspend your license for certain infractions with a commercial driver’s license (CDL). 

Your credit rating

While your record itself does not impact your credit score, your credit score can influence your ability to obtain good rates for car insurance. And, the financial fallout from a DUI, personal injury claims, or unpaid medical bills from an accident can force you into bankruptcy. 

Your job prospects

Employers generally conduct a background check before offering you a job, and a driving record could be part of that. If you want to be a firefighter, police officer, or delivery driver but you have a poor driving record, you might be out of luck. 
Key Takeaway Your driving record is more than just a document. It can have a significant impact on other areas of your life—so it’s in your best interest to keep it as clean as possible.

What is the difference between driving records in each state?

The state where you reside holds your driver’s license and driving record. So if you live in South Carolina, the state of South Carolina will hold your driving record.
South Carolina is a member of the Driver’s License Compact (DLC), an interstate agreement for the exchange of data about moving violations of non-residents.
If you commit an offense outside of state lines, the South Carolina DMV will treat that offense as it would any violation within state lines—including fines and driver’s license suspension or revocation. 
Only five states are not part of the DLC. They are:
  • Georgia
  • Massachusetts
  • Michigan
  • Tennessee
  • Wisconsin
Even still, most states have agreements to share information as it pertains to drivers and road safety.
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