Melanie Reiff
Updated on Aug 11, 2022
If the trunk latch release button in your vehicle stops working, you may need a cable replacement.
A broken trunk latch release cable disables a driver from opening the trunk with a button or lever inside the vehicle. It is not a critical problem—trunks have alternate methods of opening—but it is an inconvenient one that can be fixed with the help of a trustworthy mechanic.
Here, the car insurance super app Jerry breaks down what a trunk latch release cable replacement involves.
The exact cost varies between different Maserati models. For example, newer vehicle models are usually made with more expensive materials, so recent or high-end models will cost more, especially if your service requires a part replacement. Use the table below to estimate the cost for your own vehicle.
CarTotal Cost EstimateParts CostLabor CostAverage Dealer PriceEstimated Service Duration
1973
Maserati 
Bora
$72$0$72$721.2h
2019
Maserati 
GranTurismo
$122.66$50.26$72.4$137.741.21h
1983
Maserati 
Quattroporte
$72$0$72$721.2h
2007
Maserati 
Coupe
$72$0$72$721.2h
1968
Maserati 
Mexico
$72$0$72$721.2h
1985
Maserati 
Biturbo
$72$0$72$721.2h

What is a trunk latch release cable replacement?

This service means that your mechanic is installing and connecting a new cable from your trunk latch to the release button or lever near the driver’s seat. This allows you to open the trunk from inside the vehicle.
You might need a trunk latch release cable replacement if the cable has snapped or become damaged.
When it is functioning properly, the release cable either pulls the trunk latch open as the driver pulls a lever, or it runs from an electric actuator to the trunk latch when a release button is pressed.

How is a trunk latch release cable replaced?

To replace a trunk latch release cable, a mechanic will typically follow these steps:
  • Open the vehicle trunk and remove trim paneling to access cable
  • Remove the broken cable from the latch and its interior connection point
  • Install a new cable—connecting it to the latch and the same interior point
  • Put the trim paneling back on and test the release button/lever for operation

Signs that your trunk latch release cable needs replacement

Here are some ways to tell if your trunk latch release cable needs replacing:
  • Test the release button or lever—if the trunk doesn’t open, then check if it still opens with your trunk key (so you know that it’s the cable that’s not working, versus another latch mechanism)
  • Pull on the trunk handle—a loose or broken cable can make it so your trunk does not latch or unlatch
  • Listen for the click—if your trunk clicks but does not release when the button or lever are engaged, this can signal damage in the cable, too
You might not need to replace the entire cable in some situations. Therefore, it’s best to check with your mechanic if you encounter any issues opening your trunk.

How important is a trunk latch release cable replacement?

Because you can still open your trunk with your trunk key, a broken release cable isn’t a major concern. Replacing it is a priority of convenience.

How to save on car insurance

Along with maintaining your car’s functionality, it’s important to make sure you have good insurance. Jerry can make this process easy.
Through a comprehensive cross-analysis of 50+ top insurance companies, Jerry will find you the cheapest quotes for your policy needs without sacrificing coverage.
Once you decide on a policy, Jerry can finalize it and even help cancel your old one—no calls needed on your end (unless you want one!).
The average Jerry customer saves **$879 per year **on car insurance.
Keep in mind that your location is another factor that determines the final cost of repairs. Areas with higher cost of living will usually have more expensive car repair services, especially if there’s less local competition. Check out the table below for an estimate of what Maserati drivers pay in different cities.
CityCarTotal Cost EstimateParts CostLabor CostAverage Dealer PriceEstimated Service Duration
2007
Maserati 
GranSport
$162$0$162$1621.2h
1986
$150.28$0$150.28$150.281.2h
1973
Maserati 
Bora
$149.75$0$149.75$149.751.2h
1981
Maserati 
Merak
$135.44$0$135.44$135.441.2h
1962
Maserati 
Sebring
$161.1$0$161.1$161.11.2h
2015
$126.89$0$126.89$126.891.2h
1961
Maserati 
A6G/2000
$140.4$0$140.4$140.41.2h
2007
Maserati 
Coupe
$152.3$0$152.3$152.31.2h
1961
Maserati 
3500GT
$142.5$0$142.5$142.51.2h
1989
Maserati 
228i
$130.54$0$130.54$130.541.2h
Jerry doesn’t just offer fair price repair estimates for Maserati drivers! Our team of writers has collected everything you need to know for every car. Here’s how much the repair costs for some popular cars:
CarTotal Cost EstimateParts CostLabor CostAverage Dealer PriceEstimated Service Duration
1963
Ford 
Sprint
$127.95$49.95$78$142.931.3h
1977
Ford 
F-150
$127.95$49.95$78$142.931.3h
1989
Pontiac 
6000
$116.38$44.38$72$129.691.2h
2014
Ford 
F-350 Super Duty
$127.95$49.95$78$142.931.3h
2010
$133.98$49.98$84$148.971.4h
2003
Ford 
F-150
$127.95$49.95$78$142.931.3h
The cost of repairs might vary depending on which Maserati you drive, but there’s an easy way to save money for the services you need! Just download the Jerry app for help lowering your insurance premiums. In less than 45 seconds, Jerry collects all of your information from your existing insurer. Choose from competitive quotes from top insurance companies and Jerry takes care of the rest—securing your new policy and helping you cancel your old one upon request.
With an average annual savings of $887, Jerry can help you free up funds for the repairs your Maserati’s needs.