Melanie Reiff
Updated on Aug 11, 2022
If you notice that your car is starting and then dying soon afterward, it’s best to get an inspection service from a qualified mechanic. The mechanic can determine the source of the problem by inspecting the fuel pump relay, ignition coil, and mass airflow sensor, then performing any necessary repairs.
For a car that shuts off as soon as you start it, you’ll find that it’s usually a problem with the fuel or the car’s electrical system. But to get to the bottom of the issue, you’ll need a full inspection. That’s why Jerry, the car insurance super app, has compiled everything you need to know about this service.
The exact cost varies between different Fiat models. For example, newer vehicle models are usually made with more expensive materials, so recent or high-end models will cost more, especially if your service requires a part replacement. Use the table below to estimate the cost for your own vehicle.
CarTotal Cost EstimateParts CostLabor CostAverage Dealer PriceEstimated Service Duration
1982
Fiat 
X-1/9
$60$0$60$601h
1978
Fiat 
131
$60$0$60$601h
1963
Fiat 
600D
$60$0$60$601h
1966
Fiat 
1100D
$60$0$60$601h
1982
Fiat 
Strada
$60$0$60$601h
1963
Fiat 
1200
$60$0$60$601h

What happens during an inspection for a car that starts then dies?

If your car keeps starting then dying, a mechanic can perform an inspection to figure out what is causing the problem. The mechanic will probably investigate each of the following parts and perform the necessary repairs:

Fuel pump relay

If your mechanic suspects that there’s an issue with the fuel pump relay, she can start by taking a look at your car’s computer.
If there’s an issue with your car’s computer misreading your fuel pump relay, the computer may need to be replaced—or simply reprogrammed. If the issue is indeed with your fuel pump relay, your mechanic might need to replace your fuel pump relay.

Ignition coil

If your mechanic finds that your ignition coil is faulty, she’ll likely need to replace it. First, she’ll disconnect the battery, and then remove the ignition coil from the engine bay. After installing the new ignition coil, she’ll reconnect the battery and check that the new ignition coil is working properly.

Mass airflow sensor

First, your mechanic will need to locate your mass airflow sensor in the engine bay and assess it for problems. She can also check the wire harness that the sensor connects to and make sure there aren’t any misconnected wires. If everything is connected properly but the sensor is faulty, she can then replace the sensor.
Since all of these issues involve the electronic control unit (ECU) of your car, your mechanic should be able to connect to your engine’s computer (usually through a code reader) to see what the problem is and diagnose your car’s issue(s) accordingly.

Do I need this service?

If your car is starting and then quickly dying, it’s best to get it inspected by a qualified mechanic. There are a number of possible causes for this problem, so you’ll want someone to investigate fully.
Also, a mechanic can access information from your car’s computer to get a better sense of the issue. Since you don’t have access to this data on your own, it’s best to get an inspection when you start noticing this problem.

How important is it to get an inspection if my car starts then dies?

This inspection is definitely important. First of all, it’s not very easy to drive a car that keeps dying. Second, a problem of this nature will probably just get worse if it’s ignored.
If your car keeps dying after you start it, it’s best to get the issue inspected sooner rather than later.

How do I get the right car insurance coverage?

Finish out your car maintenance saga by locking in the right auto insurance coverage!
In less than 45 seconds, the Jerry app can generate free, personalized quotes straight to your phone screen. Think online shopping, but for car insurance—and with all your options in one place, on the same platform.
Plus, when you buy a policy through Jerry, you get the convenience of having Jerry’s team do all the sign-ups and renewals for you. That means no phone calls and no paperwork for you—just an average of $879 worth of savings every year!
Keep in mind that your location is another factor that determines the final cost of repairs. Areas with higher cost of living will usually have more expensive car repair services, especially if there’s less local competition. Check out the table below for an estimate of what Fiat drivers pay in different cities.
CityCarTotal Cost EstimateParts CostLabor CostAverage Dealer PriceEstimated Service Duration
1982
Fiat 
Strada
$112.87$0$112.87$112.871h
1966
Fiat 
1100D
$126.95$0$126.95$126.951h
1965
Fiat 
1500
$130.67$0$130.67$130.671h
1973
Fiat 
850
$111.68$0$111.68$111.681h
Dublin
PA
1963
Fiat 
1200
$104.33$0$104.33$104.331h
1978
Fiat 
131
$111.58$0$111.58$111.581h
North Pole
AK
1961
Fiat 
125
$116$0$116$1161h
1982
Fiat 
X-1/9
$118.75$0$118.75$118.751h
1980
Fiat 
Brava
$115.48$0$115.48$115.481h
West Point
PA
1961
Fiat 
600
$103.59$0$103.59$103.591h
Jerry doesn’t just offer fair price repair estimates for Fiat drivers! Our team of writers has collected everything you need to know for every car. Here’s how much the repair costs for some popular cars:
CarTotal Cost EstimateParts CostLabor CostAverage Dealer PriceEstimated Service Duration
2018
$60$0$60$601h
2020
$60$0$60$601h
1979
GMC 
P2500
$60$0$60$601h
1992
Ford 
F-250
$60$0$60$601h
1965
Land Rover 
Land Rover
$60$0$60$601h
1968
Chevrolet 
C10 Suburban
$60$0$60$601h
The cost of repairs might vary depending on which Fiat you drive, but there’s an easy way to save money for the services you need! Just download the Jerry app for help lowering your insurance premiums. In less than 45 seconds, Jerry collects all of your information from your existing insurer. Choose from competitive quotes from top insurance companies and Jerry takes care of the rest—securing your new policy and helping you cancel your old one upon request.
With an average annual savings of $887, Jerry can help you free up funds for the repairs your Fiat’s needs.