Is it Cheaper to Paint Your Car the Same Color? 

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Driving in field (Photo: @nina_p_v via Twenty20)
There are many reasons you might want to repaint your car. It could be that your paint is fading or you’ve recently been in a minor accident. Maybe you’re looking to increase your resale value or, hey, you might just want a new color!
If you’re one of the latter and you’re considering a new paint job to change the color of your vehicle, you might be worried about the cost of a new color far exceeding the cost of painting your vehicle the same color. But is that actually the case?

Is it cheaper to paint your car the same color?

Yes, we’re sorry to say, in most scenarios a new color is more expensive than reapplying the same color.

Why is it cheaper to paint your car the same color?

It’s more affordable to get a new paint job in your car’s original color because it requires less paint. When you think of the areas of your car that need to be repainted, you’re probably considering the hood, doors, and roof. These areas have been subjected to sun and weather exposure. And they’re also the most likely places to be damaged in an accident. Therefore, they display the majority of the wear and tear present on your vehicle.
However, there are many painted parts of your car that are not subjected to years of damaging elements like the spaces behind the door handles, the painted sections under your hood, and the insides of the doors and panels. If you take your car for a fresh paint job, the person applying the paint can skip these areas, which incidentally saves you money on paint.
However, if you opt for a new color, all of those places will need to be repainted. They are usually also the trickiest places of the car to paint and may require more prep work, which may drive up your cost even more.

When is it not cheaper to paint your car the same color? 

You have the option to forgo painting the hidden spaces that have not been subjected to wear and tear when you repaint your vehicle the same color, which can save you money. But if you decide to opt for a total repaint of the original color (hidden places included), it will cost the same price as changing the color of your vehicle. So, if you’re going all-in for a total paint job, changing the color is not more expensive.
If you own a luxury vehicle, it might actually be more expensive to paint your car the same color. High-end vehicles have special paint (which could mean anything from requiring more layers to unique application techniques). Therefore, a new paint job with less-expensive paint would cost less than the reapplication of luxury paint.
If you’re searching for a way to spruce up your ride without investing in a new paint job, consider using vinyl wraps. They can change the color of your car, without damaging the paint beneath. They also come in fun patterns so you can express yourself without a long-term commitment. A clear coat of paint also goes a long way when it comes to improving the look of your vehicle’s old paint.
Regardless of whether or not you opt for a paint job in a new or old color, maintaining your vehicle’s appearance is a great way to help it retain value (and keep you looking spiffy out on the open road).