Cheap Car Insurance to Get if You're a a College Student

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Going away to college represents a big step in any young person’s life. If you plan on driving your car to university, you need to get insurance. Many insurance companies offer special discounts to students in an effort to keep their car insurance premiums lower.
Find out more about what college students need to keep in mind when deciding on the best insurance coverage for their needs.

When can a college student stay on their parent’s car insurance?

Many students stay on their parent’s policy through college. A student can stay on their parents’ plan as long as they meet the following requirements:
  • You don’t own the vehicle you drive
  • You still live in your parent’s home
  • You still list your parent’s address as your primary address, even if you are a full-time student

Things to consider when getting insurance for the first time

Even if you don’t take your vehicle with you to college and only drive it when you go home, you still need car insurance. In addition to protecting your vehicle if someone has an accident in it, your insurance also helps cover you if you have an accident in someone else’s car while at college. At the very least, you should stay on your parent’s policy, if possible. But if you own a vehicle, you must get your own insurance policy. Some factors to keep in mind when acquiring insurance when attending college include:
  • Out-of-state schools: If you plan on attending college in another state, make sure that you understand the coverage minimums of the state you plan on moving to. The following from ValuePenguin shows the liability coverage minimum requirements by state:
Liability Coverage Requirements by State
State Body Injury Liability per Person / Bodily Injury Liability per Accident / Property Damage Coverage Requirements
Alabama $25,000 / 50,000 / 25,000
Alaska $50,000 / 100,000 / 25,000
Arizona $15,000 / 30,000 / 10,000
Arkansas $25,000 / 50,000 / 25,000
California $15,000 / 30,000 / 5,000
Colorado $25,000 / 40,000 / 10,000
Connecticut $20,000 / 40,000 / 10,000
Delaware $15,000 / 30,000 / 10,000
District of Columbia $25,000 / 50,000 / 10,000
Florida $10,000 / 20,000 / 10,000
Georgia $25,000 / 50,000 / 25,000
Hawaii $20,000 / 40,000 / 10,000
Idaho $25,000 / 50,000 / 15,000
Illinois $20,000 / 40,000 / 15,000
Indiana $25,000 / 50,000 / 10,000
Iowa $20,000 / 40,000 / 15,000
Kansas $25,000 / 50,000 / 10,000
Kentucky $25,000 / 50,000 / 10,000
Louisiana $15,000 / 30,000 / 25,000
Maine $15,000 / 30,000 / 10,000
Maryland $30,000 / 60,000 / 15,000
Massachusetts $30,000 / 60,000 / 15,000
Michigan $20,000 / 40,000 / 10,000
Minnesota $20,000 / 40,000 / 10,000
Mississippi $25,000 / 50,000 / 25,000
Missouri $25,000 / 50,000 / 10,000
Montana $25,000 / 50,000 / 10,000
Nebraska $25,000 / 50,000 / 25,000
Nevada $15,000 / 30,000 / 5,000
New Hampshire $25,000 / 50,000 / 25,000
New Jersey $15,000 / 30,000 / 5,000
New Mexico $25,000 / 50,000 / 10,000
New York $25,000 / 50,000 / 10,000
North Carolina $30,000 / 60,000 / 25,000
North Dakota $25,000 / 50,000 / 25,000
Ohio $12,500 / 25,000 / 7,500
Oklahoma $25,000 / 50,000 / 25,000
Oregon $25,000 / 50,000 / 20,000
Pennsylvania $15,000 / 30,000 / 5,000
Rhode Island $25,000 / 50,000 / 25,000
South Carolina $25,000 / 50,000 / 25,000
South Dakota $25,000 / 50,000 / 25,000
Tennessee $25,000 / 50,000 / 15,000
Texas $30,000 / 60,000 / 25,000
Utah $25,000 / 65,000 / 15,000
Vermont $25,000 / 50,000 / 10,000
Virginia $25,000 / 50,000 / 20,000
Washington $25,000 / 50,000 / 10,000
West Virginia $25,000 / 50,000 / 25,000
Wisconsin $25,000 / 50,000 / 10,000
Wyoming $25,000 / 50,000 / 20,000
Source: ValuePenguin
  • Resident student discounts: Some colleges offer college students discounts if they find themselves attending college 100 or more miles away from their parent’s home. This discount only remains in effect if you don’t drive your vehicle, such as when you leave it at your parent’s house while away.
  • Occasional driver discounts: If you leave your car at your parent’s house while away at school, there is a good chance that you also qualify for a low-mileage discount. Make sure to ask your agent about low-mileage discounts and if they apply to your policy.
  • Good student discounts: Getting good grades in college can also result in lower car insurance premiums. Many high school students use this discount to help keep their premiums down, and sometimes this discount can extend into college. Make sure to ask your insurance agent if you can still get a good student discount while in college.
Acquiring car insurance upon entering college does not always equate to high premiums. Paying attention to what discounts a company offers can help reduce your rates and make your insurance premiums more affordable.

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